Sign up for newsletter
 

McCready's family expresses "deep sadness" over her death

Monday, February 18, 2013 – Mindy McCready's publicist issued a statement Monday expressing the "deep sadness' felt by the late singer's family in the wake of her death on Sunday at 37 from an apparent suicide.

"It is with the deepest sadness we say goodbye to an extraordinary and gifted talent, a daughter, a mother and friend, Miss Mindy McCready," said the statement from Music City Media.

"Our attention at this time is devoted to the needs and care of Mindy's family. As Mindy spent much of her life in the public eye, we respectfully request your consideration and sensitivity to enable friends and family this time of 'quiet.'"

Music City said that preliminary plans "are being made by Mindy's musical friends to organize a memorial in Nashville in the coming days. "We will pass along updates and information surrounding details, as they are officiated by both family and friends," the statement said.

McCready apparently died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound in Heber Springs, Ark. on Sunday afternoon. Her death came about one month after the death of her boyfriend, David Wilson, who was the father of McCready's younger son Zayne. McCready also leaves a son Zander.

McCready had several hits in the '90s before a multitude of problems including substance abuse issues, trouble relationships with family and boyfriends, custody issues involving her two sons and a music career that she was trying to revive.

More news for Mindy McCready

CD reviews for Mindy McCready

I'm Still Here CD review - I'm Still Here
Not much has gone well for Mindy McCready since her first album, "Ten Thousand Angels ," went multi-platinum way back in 1996. After a few brushes with the law, a stretch in prison, a couple of suicide attempts, and a season on Celebrity Rehab (not to mention the looming release of an unwanted sex tape), it's fairly extraordinary that McCready is putting forth her first album in eight years. Even more remarkable: the fact that it's actually pretty good. »»»
Mindy McCready
For the first time, Mindy McCready got to pick the songs for this her fourth CD of all-new material. This turned out to be a mistake as with the possible exception of "Tremble," which at least shoots for something, none of the songs she chose do more than get your hopes up and then dash them. On "Lovin' Your Man," McCready breaks her promise to never record a cheating song - sort of; it's actually more of a sisterly apology to the wronged wife. On "Scream," we hope we'll get to hear some of the »»»
I'm Not So Tough
A few years ago, women were hailed as the next great thing of country with the Carpenters, Yearwoods and Hills leading the way in the heretofore male-dominated field. Like their sisters of yesteryear who also morphed from a more straightahead country beat, McCready opted for a far more glossy, pop sound with some country overtones. But her album could just as easily fit a pop or adult contemporary format. McCready made a big splash with her debut, flubbed her sophomore release and became more a »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Trampled by Turtles leads stellar night – The animals ruled, for the most part, led by Trampled by Turtles, in a superb trifecta of music long on musicianship and quality songs. Trampled by Turtles, who headlined the sterling bill that also included Elephant Revival and Hurray for the Riff Raff (not animalistic unless the "riff raff" act that way), are going through some major sonic changes.... »»»
Concert Review: Goodnight, Texas gets on the map – Goodnight, Texas is a town with a small population - 28 according to the band's web site. So, if anything is going to put the unincorporated dot on the map, it may be the bi-coastal country band that stole the name. Avi Vinocur, who dwells in San Francisco, and Patrick Dyer Wolf, of North Carolina, are the mainstays of the band with them... »»»
Subscribe to Country News Digest Country News Digest      Follow Country Standard Time on twitter CST      Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook CST

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Trampled by Turtles get wild Trampled By Turtles is an indie folk group, an alt.-country band or a bluegrass act - depending on how you choose to look at them. Perhaps it's best to view the outfit as the ultimate combo platter consisting of just about everything that's good about American music. They play wonderfully, yet they also write intelligent songs that draw everyone from Townes Van Zandt to Nirvana to Ralph Stanley. It's all good, and some (or all) of these influences can be spotted in most of Trampled By Turtles' enjoyable sounds.... »»»
Don't try labeling Parker Millsap If you move in alt.-country/Americana circles, you simply cannot get away from the name Parker Millsap. He's certainly one of the biggest buzz artists of 2014. Better still, his self-titled album lives up to all the hype. He's a smart songwriter and a passionate singer and is essential listening for anybody looking for high quality contemporary music. Millsap also creates music appealing to a wide variety of musical tastes. You can make a case that he's a country guy, but you can also hear a lot of blues and folk. And if you attempt to put a label on him, he'll quickly tear it right off.... »»»
Simpson gets metamodern What a difference a year can make. Last year, Sturgill Simpson was overly anxious about the arrival of his debut album, "High Top Mountain." This year, Simpson is simultaneously anticipating the birth of his debut child and his just-released sophomore album, "Metamodern Sounds in Country Music," and his mood couldn't be more relaxed and joyous.... »»»
Three Bells CD review - Three Bells
It must be frustrating to resophonic artists of the stature of these three that even they still have to on occasion answer the question "What is that thing you're playing?" The number of well-known Dobro players has always seemed to lag behind even the banjo, and even in the "Golden Years" of '50s and '60s country music, the only widely known names were Josh Graves and Pete "Brother Oswald" Kirby. »»»
The Earls of Leicester CD review - The Earls of Leicester
In 1946, Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs were integral parts of Bill Monroe's Blue Grass Boys when they recorded a series of singles that most historians of the music consider the "birth of bluegrass" as we know it. Upon leaving to form their own band, The Foggy Mountain Boys (much to Monroe's consternation), they spent most of the 1950s recording one landmark single after another. »»»
The Cowboy Rides Away: Live From AT&T Stadium CD review - The Cowboy Rides Away: Live From AT&T Stadium
George Strait has been one of the most dependable country music stars for three decades. In this day and age, the Texan is a certifiable throwback. He's low key, not a self-promoter. All's he has done is churn out hit after hit for decade after decade. He has not been the kind of artist who put his finger up in the air either or trading his cowboy hat for a baseball cap. When looking up the definition of traditional country, George Strait sits at the top. »»»