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McCready dead in apparent suicide

Sunday, February 17, 2013 – The sad life of singer Mindy McCready ended today at 37 with McCready apparently committing suicide.

While McCready had several hit singles more than a decade ago, her life was later marked by run-ins with the law, jail time and substance abuse issues.

Her death followed by several weeks the death of her boyfriend, David Wilson, and father of their two children on Jan. 13 also of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot.

Dateline reporter Andrea Canning tweeted, "Just got a call from Mindy McCready's best friend that she shot and killed herself this evening."

Her body was found in Heber Springs, Ark., according to a E! Online source, Billboard reported.

TMZ reported that The Cleburne County Sheriff's Office released a statement this evening that reads:

"At 3:31 PM, Sunday, February 17th Deputies from the Cleburne County Sheriff's Office were dispatched to a report of gun shots fired in the area of 1132 Fox Chase Drive in Heber Springs. Officers arrived on the scene at 3:58 PM and discovered the body of 37 year old Melinda Gayle McCready on the front porch of the residence at 1132 Fox Chase. Ms. McCready was pronounced dead at the scene from what appears to be a single self-inflicted gunshot wound. At this time family members have been notified of the incident. Ms. Mcready will be transported to the Arkansas State Crime Lab for an autopsy and the matter will be fully investigated."

McCready's two children, Zander and Zayne, were removed from her home by a judge on Feb. 6, and she was sent to a to a treatment facility for a mental-health and alcohol-abuse evaluation. McCready was released two days later.

The Florida native attempted suicide twice before - in 2005 and 2008.

McCready had 3 top 10 hits: Ten Thousand Angels, which hit number 6 in 1996, Guys Do It All the Time, a chart topper later that year, and A Girl's Gotta Do (What a Girl's Gotta Do, which reached number 4 in1997.

More news for Mindy McCready

CD reviews for Mindy McCready

I'm Still Here CD review - I'm Still Here
Not much has gone well for Mindy McCready since her first album, "Ten Thousand Angels ," went multi-platinum way back in 1996. After a few brushes with the law, a stretch in prison, a couple of suicide attempts, and a season on Celebrity Rehab (not to mention the looming release of an unwanted sex tape), it's fairly extraordinary that McCready is putting forth her first album in eight years. Even more remarkable: the fact that it's actually pretty good. »»»
Mindy McCready
For the first time, Mindy McCready got to pick the songs for this her fourth CD of all-new material. This turned out to be a mistake as with the possible exception of "Tremble," which at least shoots for something, none of the songs she chose do more than get your hopes up and then dash them. On "Lovin' Your Man," McCready breaks her promise to never record a cheating song - sort of; it's actually more of a sisterly apology to the wronged wife. On "Scream," we hope we'll get to hear some of the »»»
I'm Not So Tough
A few years ago, women were hailed as the next great thing of country with the Carpenters, Yearwoods and Hills leading the way in the heretofore male-dominated field. Like their sisters of yesteryear who also morphed from a more straightahead country beat, McCready opted for a far more glossy, pop sound with some country overtones. But her album could just as easily fit a pop or adult contemporary format. McCready made a big splash with her debut, flubbed her sophomore release and became more a »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Cactus Blossoms move beyond Everlys – The Cactus Blossoms most obvious comparison is the Everly Brothers. Yes, Page Burkum and Jack Torrey are brothers, and they sure sounded like it. But only playing the Everlys card in describing The Cactus Blossoms would have sold them short. While the harmonies played a large role throughout, Torrey enjoyed a number of songs where he was the lead... »»»
Concert Review: Richey needn't chase any more – The opening lines of Kim Richey's "Chase Wild Horses," one of the best tracks on her excellent new CD, "Edgeland," starts with the lines: "I don't chase wild horses any more/I'm all done running from the way I was before Things I've done that I ain't proud of / I can't even stand the sound of I... »»»
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