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Paisley discloses songs on his "Wheelhouse"

Tuesday, February 12, 2013 – Brad Paisley confirmed the list of songs for his eighth regular studio album, "Wheelhouse," set for release on Arista Nashville on Tuesday, April 9. The disc will contains 17 songs.

Beginning today, fans will be able to participate in an interactive reveal of the "Wheelhouse" and "Wheelhouse (Deluxe Version)" album covers at www.paisley.com. The layered reveal experience includes a fan mosaic, hidden icons that unlock special items, an exclusive making-of-the-album interview and information on how to enter a national sweepstakes.

Produced by Paisley, he wrote or co-wrote all of the complete songs featured on "Wheelhouse," including the lead hit, Southern Comfort Zone.

The songs are:

1. "Bon Voyage"

2. "Southern Comfort Zone" [Paisley/Chris DuBois/Kelley Lovelace]

3. "Beat This Summer" [Paisley/Chris DuBois/Luke Laird]

4. "Outstanding In Our Field" (Featuring Dierks Bentley and Roger Miller with Hunter Hayes on guitar) [Paisley/Mike Dean/Chris DuBois/Lee Thomas Miller/Roger Miller]

5. "Pressing On A Bruise" (Featuring Mat Kearney) [Paisley/Mat Kearney/Kelley Lovelace]

6. "I Can't Change The World" [Paisley/Chris DuBois/Kelley Lovelace]

7. "幽 女" [Paisley/Justin Williamson/Randle Currie]

8. "Karate" (Featuring Charlie Daniels) [Paisley/Chris DuBois/Kelley Lovelace]

9. "Death of a Married Man" (Featuring Eric Idle) [Paisley]

10. "Harvey Bodine" [Paisley/Chris DuBois/Kelley Lovelace]

11. "Tin Can On A String" [Paisley/Ashley Gorley/Kelley Lovelace]

12. "Death Of A Single Man" [Paisley/Kelley Lovelace/Lee Thomas Miller]

13. "The Mona Lisa" [Paisley/Chris DuBois]

14. "Accidental Racist" (Featuring LL Cool J) [Paisley/Lee Thomas Miller/LL Cool J]

15. "Runaway Train" [Paisley/Chris DuBois/Kelley Lovelace]

16. "Those Crazy Christians" [Paisley/Kelley Lovelace]

17. "Officially Alive" [Paisley]

Four additional tracks will be included on the "Wheelhouse (Deluxe Version)."

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Hits Alive CD review - Hits Alive
Brad Paisley's new live hits CD is a bit of a tease. That's because it only goes half way in replicating the true live Paisley experience. Watching the accompanying concert videos at a Paisley show, whether the venue screen is showing Andy Griffith during Waitin' on a Woman or the montage of recently-deceased celebrities that accompanies When I Get Where I'm Going, reveal how Paisley simply must be seen to be fully enjoyed. Nevertheless, Paisley in concert and captured on »»»
American Saturday Night CD review - American Saturday Night
Brad Paisley has grown up on his eighth album. Yes, the West Virginian maintains a sense of humor, but apparently aging has left its mark on a maturing singer who has never forsaken his country roots. That is ever so apparent in songs like Anything Like Me and Oh Yeah, You're Gone. The former finds Paisley looking at the passage of time through his son's life in a tender, but not sappy look. On the latter, he's a five-year-old boy who doesn't get what he wants, which his grandfather notices. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Cadillac Three, Sellers do it their own way – The way The Cadillac Three lead singer Jaren Johnston told it, the band could have had their choice of opening tours this year for the likes of Kenny Chesney, Dierks Bentley and Jake Owen. No go though because the long-haired singer fronting the rough-and-most-definitely ready trio said the band wanted to do it their own way. Based on this most... »»»
Concert Review: Great songs, not glitz, highlight Lynn tribute – An eclectic group of Americana artists gathered together for a relatively low-key tribute to Loretta Lynn on the eve of the glitzy Grammy Awards. In contrast to the expensive dresses and song sets displayed at Staples Center for the awards show TV broadcast, these performers were backed by a skillful traditional country music house band.... »»»
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