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Daniels, Travis, Johnson join Jones farewell to Nashville gig

Monday, February 4, 2013 – n George Jones final Nashville concert of his career on Nov. 22 will include Charlie Daniels, Lorrie Morgan, Randy Travis, Jamey Johnson and Gene Watson.

They were announced Monday as the first round of special guests that will join previously announced guest Tanya Tucker to help honor this legendary entertainer with special performances.

Jones will mark the end of an era with 2013's farewell tour titled "The Grand Tour" with approximately 60 stops this year.

Tour dates are:
Feb. 7 - Lakeland, FL - Youkey Theater
Feb. 22 - Greenville, TX - Greenville Memorial Auditorium
Feb. 23 - Forrest City, AR - East Arkansas Community College
March 15 - Joliet, IL - Realto Square Theater
March 16 - Muncie, IN - Emens Auditorium
March 22 - Chattanooga, TN - Memorial Auditorium
March 23 - Evansville, IN - The Centre
April 5 - Fairfax, VA - Patriot Center
April 6 - Knoxville, TN - Knoxville Coliseum
April 19 - Atlanta, GA - Fox Theater
April 20 - Salem, VA - Salem Civic Center
April 27 - Huntsville, AL - Mark C. Smith Concert Hall
May 17 - Charlottesville, VA - John Paul Jones Arena
May 18 - Spartanburg, SC - Memorial Auditorium
June 1 - North Tonawanda, NY - Riviera Theater
June 2 - Lancaster, PA - American Music Theater
Aug. 2 - Columbus, OH - Ohio State Fair
Aug. 3 - Watertown, NY - Watertown Fairgrounds Arena
Sept. 13 - Biloxi, MS - IP Casino
Sept. 27 - Prior Lake, MN - Mystic Lake Casino
Sept. 28 - Milwaukee, WI - Potawatomi Casino
Oct. 11 - Branson, MO - The Mansion Theater
Oct. 25 - Mt. Pleasant, MI - Soaring Eagle Casino
Oct. 26 - Pikeville, KY - Eastern KY Expo
Nov. 9 - Grant, OK - Choctaw Event Center
Nov. 10 - Branson, MO - The Mansion Theater
Nov. 22 - Nashville - Bridgestone Arena

More news for George Jones

CD reviews for George Jones

The Hits CD review - The Hits
George Jones tends to rely on his past these days, so it's not surprising that "The Hits" is his new CD. The 24-song set does include a few previously unreleased songs, but that may not be enough to persuade all but the diehards to buy this. Jones recorded Eddy Raven's I Should Have Called and Al Anderson-Steven Bruton's I Ain't Ever Slowing Down about five years ago with Keith Stegall producing, and both appear here for the first time. The former is a bit poppy, »»»
Step Right Up 1970-1979: A Critical Anthology CD review - Step Right Up 1970-1979: A Critical Anthology
As retrospectives go, this new 28-track collection of George Jones' work from the 1970s is a bit of an anomaly. While most other compilations present chart-topping singles in chronological order, this single-disc set from the Australian reissue specialists at Raven Records provides an overview of Jones' total artistic output for the entire decade, regardless of chart position. This approach works well in this case because it covers songs not usually included on George Jones compilations. »»»
George Jones: Burn Your Playhouse Down, the unreleased duets CD review - George Jones: Burn Your Playhouse Down, the unreleased duets
There are few revelations in this George Jones duets collection culled primarily from "The Bradley Barn Sessions" (1993 recordings). Producers have their reasons. Perhaps the biggest surprise is when Jones is outsung by one of his duet partners, Georgette Jones, the only child of his marriage to Tammy Wynette. Georgette may have the best singing genes in history, but it is time as much as anything that pushes Dad into a subordinate role on You and Me and Time. The revelation, then, is a »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: No wonder life is good for Shovels & Rope – Things are go swimmingly - pun intended - for Shovels & Rope, the South Carolina-based duo comprised of husband-and-wife Cary Ann Hearst and Michael Trent. For starters, their new disc, "Swimmin' Time," debuted at 21 on the Billboard Top 200 in its first week just a few shot weeks ago. On the local front, the band was playing two... »»»
Concert Review: Americana fest moves beyond borders – It's the final night of the 2014 Americana Festival and Conference, and the final event of a spectacular five-day run. Lucinda Williams is about to begin a last minute invitation-only performance at the newly opened City Winery in Nashville, but first, Americana Music Association Executive Director Jed Hilly walks to the microphone.... »»»
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