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Son Volt goes honky tonk

Thursday, January 31, 2013 – Son Volt will release "Honky Tonk," the follow-up to 2009's "American Central Dust" on March 5 on Rounder.

The album features 11 new Son Volt songs that are inspired by the classic honky tonk sound of Bakersfield. Bandleader Jay Farrar said, "Honky tonk music is about heartache, heartbreak, the road."

"I wanted these songs to sound more contemporary and modern. There was no strict adherence to methodology of the past. You never want to be a nostalgia act," Farrar said.

On the new disc, Son Volt adopts a more acoustic-based sound. Many of its compositions mine a thematic lyrical vein inspired by a traditional country music aesthetic, which Farrar first explored on "American Central Dust."

"I was always averse to using certain words in songs, including 'love' and 'heart,'" he said. "But I started using them on 'American Central Dust,' and now I guess the floodgates have opened."

Farrar said his decision to learn a new instrument inspired an intense exploration of honky tonk music: "In the time between Son Volt records, I started learning pedal steel guitar. I play with a local band in St. Louis now and then called Colonel Ford. So I was immersed in honky tonk music, the Bakersfield sound, in particular. And it was almost second nature when I started writing the songs for this record."

Songs on the CD are:

1. Hearts and Minds

2. Brick Walls

3. Wild Side

4. Down the Highway

5. Bakersfield

6. Livin' On

7. Tears of Change

8. Angel of the Blues

9. Seawall

10. Barricades

11. Shine On

Tour dates are:
April 10 - Mercy Lounge - Nashville, TN
April 11 - The Orange Peel - Asheville, NC
April 12 - Terminal West - Atlanta, GA
April 13 - Cat's Cradle - Carrboro, NC
April 14 - Bijou Theatre - Knoxville, TN
April 16 - WorkPlay Theatre - Birmingham, AL
April 17 - The Parish - New Orleans, LA
April 18 - Continental Club - Houston, TX
April 19 - Old Settler's Music Festival - Austin, TX
April 20 - Sons of Herman Hall - Dallas, TX

More news for Son Volt

CD reviews for Son Volt

Trace (Remastered and Expanded) CD review - Trace (Remastered and Expanded)
Son Volt was one of the two bands that rose from the considerable ashes of the May 1994 Uncle Tupelo breakup. While Jeff Tweedy and the current Uncle Tupelo lineup formed Wilco, his former partner, singer/songwriter/instrumentalist Jay Farrar, teamed with Uncle Tupelo founding drummer Mike Heidorn to create Son Volt. Fans knew what to expect from the formidable but volatile Tweedy/Farrar partnership, but what would come from these new efforts? Any lingering questions or doubts were answered when »»»
Honky Tonk CD review - Honky Tonk
Jay Farrar and his band Son Volt likely never set out to reinvent country music, but after rising from the ashes of the renegade roots outfit Uncle Tupelo, it was inevitable that they'd put a modern spin on the traditional sounds they were attempting to emulate. Yet, while former band mate Jeff Tweedy took his spin-off, Wilco, into wholly unlikely and strangely twisted directions, Farrar and company more or less kept their eye on the heartland and crafted songs more becoming of their Americana origins. »»»
American Central Dust CD review - American Central Dust
Jay Farrar's lyrical beauty takes center-stage in these dozen thought-provoking tracks. Once again, the songslinger delves into his America - past, present and future - to offer musings on the state of the world. Like a historian, Farrar paints pictures of important epochs and events in the past to understand the current climate. Sultana is the perfect example where Farrar brings to light the greatest maritime disaster in American history - the explosion of the steamboat Sultana where an »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Aldean and friends stretch it out, way out – Jason Aldean's tour, "Six String Circus," gets its name from his recent single, "Lights Come On." And titling his tour after a guitar - and more appropriately an electric guitar - makes all the sense in the world. Each act on the bill, which also included A Thousand Horses and Thomas Rhett, use a lot of guitars - but mostly in... »»»
Concert Review: The Jayhawks remain in top form – It's usually a good time to catch a band right after they've released one of their better albums, and "Paging Mr. Proust" is one of The Jayhawks' best. Comprised of smart songs, which consistently put lead singer Gary Louris' engaging vibrato to proper use and instrumental textures that oftentimes stretch the Minnesota act... »»»
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