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Country Music Hall's fundraiser gig goes to New York

Monday, January 14, 2013 – The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum's All for the Hall fundraiser will return to New York City for the first time in more than 4 years on Feb. 26, at the Best Buy Theater. The guitar pull format will feature Vince Gill and Emmylou Harris and special guests.

The evening offers a unique opportunity to see these acclaimed singer-songwriters interact with one another as they take turns swapping songs, stories and personal recollections.

The museum launched All for the Hall, its first-ever non-bricks-and-mortar fundraising campaign, in 2005. The campaign addresses the museum's need for long-term financial security and will provide a safety net for the institution and its work. This is the sixth time the museum has taken its "annual giving" event on the road, hosting previous All for the Hall events in New York in 2007 and 2008 and in Los Angeles in 2009-11.

"We are delighted to be returning to New York, and look forward to offering patrons a unique country music experience and an opportunity to engage in the life of our 45-year-old educational organization," said Museum Director Kyle Young. "This annual event facilitates understanding of the important collection, research and scholarship that are the essence of our great national museum. The contributed income derived from the event allows us to continue our mission of preserving the evolving history and traditions of country music; it helps to fund our dynamic changing exhibit schedule, our school programs, the hundreds of public programs we present each year, and more. We are very grateful for our warm welcome in previous years and look forward to seeing old friends and making new ones next month."

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CD reviews

Wrecking Ball (reissue) CD review - Wrecking Ball (reissue)
Emmylou Harris' "Wrecking Ball" was a real game changer for the revered singer/songwriter. Although she had long been known for her progressive take on country music, Harris redefined her sound on this 1995 album thanks to her collaboration with producer Daniel Lanois. Lanois, who came to prominence thanks to his production work on seminal albums from U2, Peter Gabriel, Robbie Robertson and Bob Dylan, presented Harris in an entirely new way by enveloping her always impressive »»»
Guitar Slinger CD review - Guitar Slinger
It's hard to believe, considering what Vince Gill has accomplished over the past three decades, but the triple threat singer-songwriter-guitar picker may be in the most creative, productive stretch of his lengthy, remarkable career. Five years after Gill's Grammy-winning 4-album 43-song box set "These Days," his latest 12-song release again finds Gill tapping every ounce of his immense talents. The title song sums up his reputation as an ax man worthy of playing Eric »»»
Hard Bargain CD review - Hard Bargain
If there is a one guarantee in the music world, it is that an Emmylou Harris will be filled with gorgeous singing. Since gracing Gram Parsons' solo albums in the early '70s, Harris' vocals have been among the most heavenly in contemporary music. Her latest effort, "Hard Bargain," is no exception. The disc soars on Harris' signature vocals, an exquisite intertwining of the earthy and ethereal. What makes this different than most of Harris' 30-plus albums is that »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Time makes a difference for Striking Matches – What a difference four months makes. When the duo Striking Matches debuted in Boston in late May, Sarah Zimmerman and Justin Davis capably showed off their skills, but somehow it felt like a lot of songs fell just a bit short. Davis and Zimmerman tended to cut a lot of songs abruptly, never letting them breath enough or fleshing them out.... »»»
Concert Review: Home Free sings out – Home Free, the Minnesota-based a capella quintet that first caught the nation's attention by winning the fourth season of NBC's reality competition The Sing-Off in 2013, is one of the most talented and unique acts in modern country music. The question has always been whether or not the group and their all-vocal style, which includes the... »»»
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