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Jackson headlines cancer benefit

Monday, January 14, 2013 – Alan Jackson will headline the 5th Annual "Stars Go Blue" benefit on March 20 at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville.

Jackson's show will be hosted by the oldest and largest national colon cancer patient advocacy organization, the Colon Cancer Alliance (CCA). All proceeds from the concert will benefit the CCA's Blue Note Fund, helping colon cancer patients in need, a program founded by Nashville's own Grammy-nominated artist/producer Charlie Kelley. The CCA holds the "Stars Go Blue" concert annually in support of National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. During March, organizations across the nation will place an emphasis on educating the public about colon cancer prevention and detection.

In 2010, Jackson's wife, Denise, was diagnosed with colorectal cancer. "It knocked us both down. It was so hard to watch her go through that," he said. "We were dating at 16 and 17, and I pretty much took care of her from that point on. But when it came to this, I felt like there wasn't a thing I could do."

"That rocked my world, as I'm sure it does every person who gets a cancer diagnosis," she said. "That really brought to my attention the CCA and what the organization does, and more specifically what the Blue Note Fund does for the Nashville area and the rest of the country as well."

Tickets go on sale Fri., Jan. 18 at 11 a.m. eastern at all Ticketmaster locations, Ryman Box Office, www.ryman.com and by calling 800-745-3000. Tickets are $75, $45 and $35.

Jacksonn recently released a limited number of copies of his book "Seasons of Sweetbriar - A Photographic Collection of Home by Alan Jackson." The book can be purchased through www.alanjackson.com for $25 or $50 for a book autographed by Jackson. All proceeds will be donated to the CCA's Blue NoteFund.

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The Bluegrass Album CD review - The Bluegrass Album
Alan Jackson makes his statement crystal clear with the title - "The Bluegrass Album." The traditional country singer has "gone bluegrass," although the idea of a bluegrass disc should not come off as all that far fetched. Yes, there's no pedal steel here, but the sounds, subject and voice are not very different from a typical AJ disc. And this is not the first time that Jackson has veered off the straight and narrow path as his gospel albums indicated. »»»
Precious Memories Vol. II CD review - Precious Memories Vol. II
There's nothing more pathetic than watching a country performer sweat bullets on television while performing a gospel song, seemingly to try and prove - with all this overt effort - they truly believe what they're singing about. You won't get that impression from Alan Jackson, at least not from his second collection of hymns, "Precious Memories: Vol. II." Even during There Is Power in the Blood, a song that could easily have gotten revved up beyond control, the guitar and »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Lauderdale states his case – For the uninitiated, Jim Lauderdale may have seemed like a huge name dropper. When you casually mention how you have worked with Ralph Stanley, Solomon Burke, Buddy Miller, Nick Lowe, Robert Hunter, the North Mississippi All Stars and Elvis Costello and have a radio show on Sirius/XM satellite radio during a concert, one may liken it to Lauderdale... »»»
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