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Jackson headlines cancer benefit

Monday, January 14, 2013 – Alan Jackson will headline the 5th Annual "Stars Go Blue" benefit on March 20 at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville.

Jackson's show will be hosted by the oldest and largest national colon cancer patient advocacy organization, the Colon Cancer Alliance (CCA). All proceeds from the concert will benefit the CCA's Blue Note Fund, helping colon cancer patients in need, a program founded by Nashville's own Grammy-nominated artist/producer Charlie Kelley. The CCA holds the "Stars Go Blue" concert annually in support of National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. During March, organizations across the nation will place an emphasis on educating the public about colon cancer prevention and detection.

In 2010, Jackson's wife, Denise, was diagnosed with colorectal cancer. "It knocked us both down. It was so hard to watch her go through that," he said. "We were dating at 16 and 17, and I pretty much took care of her from that point on. But when it came to this, I felt like there wasn't a thing I could do."

"That rocked my world, as I'm sure it does every person who gets a cancer diagnosis," she said. "That really brought to my attention the CCA and what the organization does, and more specifically what the Blue Note Fund does for the Nashville area and the rest of the country as well."

Tickets go on sale Fri., Jan. 18 at 11 a.m. eastern at all Ticketmaster locations, Ryman Box Office, www.ryman.com and by calling 800-745-3000. Tickets are $75, $45 and $35.

Jacksonn recently released a limited number of copies of his book "Seasons of Sweetbriar - A Photographic Collection of Home by Alan Jackson." The book can be purchased through www.alanjackson.com for $25 or $50 for a book autographed by Jackson. All proceeds will be donated to the CCA's Blue NoteFund.

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