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Richey looks ahead to "Thorn In My Heart"

Friday, January 11, 2013 – Kim Richey will make her Yep Roc Records label debut April 16 with the release of her seventh studio album,"Thorn In My Heart."

Recorded at Mr. Lemon's Studio in Nashville, "Thorn In My Heart" was produced by Neilson Hubbard (Glen Phillips, Matthew Ryan, The Apache Relay) and features 12 original compositions. The follow-up to 2010's "Wreck Your Wheels," the album features guest appearances from Jason Isbell, Trisha Yearwood, Carl Broemel of My Morning Jacket and Pat Sansone of Wilco.

Richey, a former professional chef, got her first record deal at 37 and has garnered success as a songwriter, co-writing two number one hits; the Grammy-nominated Believe Me Baby I Lied for Trisha Yearwood and Nobody Wins for Radney Foster. Other songwriting contributions include songs for Dixie Chicks, Jim Lauderdale, Brooks & Dunn and Patty Loveless. Her vocals also appear on albums by Ryan Adams and Shawn Colvin.

Her self-titled debut was released in 1995, followed by "Bitter Sweet" (1997), "Glimmer" (1999), "Rise" (2002), "The Collection" (2004/label), "Chinese Boxes" (2007, and "Wreck Your Wheels" (2010).

Songs are:
1. Thorn In My Heart
2. London Town
3. Something More
4. Breakaway Speed
5. Angel's Share
6. Come On
7. Love Is
8. I Will Wait
9. I'm Going Down
10. No Means Yes
11. Take Me To The Other Side
12. Everything's Gonna Be Good

More news for Kim Richey

CD reviews for Kim Richey

Thorn In My Heart CD review - Thorn In My Heart
Kim Richey has certainly secured a reputation as a songwriter's songwriter, co-penning two number one hits: Believe Me, Baby I Lied for Trisha Yearwood and Nobody Wins for Radney Foster. On her follow up to 2010's "Wreck Your Wheels," Richey displays not only her songwriting chops, but also her rich, often soaring, vocals, and her canny ability to capture the vagaries of love, sex, misunderstanding, contempt and disappointment in musical styles ranging from traditional country »»»
Wreck Your Wheels CD review - Wreck Your Wheels
Kim Richey's music is not made for multi-taskers. Sure, you can listen to "Wreck Your Wheels" while washing dishes and talking on the phone, but it just won't be the same. Richey sings softly, but carries a big-hearted message. She can take the simplest stuff of life and build wonderful songs around it. Take Keys, for example. Keys can be used to lock doors and keep people out. But they also allow others in. "Is it too late now to let you in?" Richey asks, over »»»
Chinese Boxes CD review - Chinese Boxes
Once upon a time, Kim Richey smartly combined rock chick instincts with country roots. And she was irresistible. Not to suggest Richey is no longer irresistible, but "Chinese Boxes" doesn't sound at all like the Richey of old. Instead, she's nearly a dead ringer for the soft and melodic Aimee Mann. Recording this disc at Eastcote Studios in West London might have something to do with its distinctly un-Americana sound. But the related fact that Giles Martin (son of George »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Newport Folk Fest retains its beauty – With acts ranging from Ray LaMontagne to The Staves to Case/Lang/Veirs, the Newport Folk Festival ran the gamut from tried and true to not so well known to brand new (sort of) acts. And that was the beauty of day one of the festival in enabling attendees to sample a wide range of music and genres, albeit little of it folk as we once knew it.... »»»
Concert Review: Hensley, Ickes have a good thing going – Chances are strong that Dobro master extraordinaire Rob Ickes has used the line a time or two when he explained his instrument of choice as "a guitar played incorrectly." The line got the requisite laughter from the small crowd of about 25 in the intimate club. His sidekick, Trey Hensley, didn't offer any such comment.... »»»
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