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Hubbard visits Dave tonight

Wednesday, January 9, 2013 – Ray Wylie Hubbard performs on Late Show With David Letterman tonight at 11:35 p.m. eastern.

Hubbard will be on TV on the heels of his current album "The Grifter's Hymnal."

CD reviews for Ray Wylie Hubbard

Tell The Devil I'm Gettin' There As Fast As I Can CD review - Tell The Devil I'm Gettin' There As Fast As I Can
Although he'd no doubt reject as pretentious the title of theologian, ecclesiastical matters are never far from Ray Wylie Hubbard's mind. You can tell from the titles of his albums - "A. Enlightenment B. Endarkenment (Hint: There is no C)", "The Grifter's Hymnal" - and the tracks therein, where he's either planning his celestial footwear ("Barefoot in Heaven") or escaping from hell by blowing smoke up the devil's derrierre ("Conversation »»»
The Ruffian's Misfortune
Make no mistake. When you cue up Ray Wylie Hubbard's new album - a bit of a follow up to 2012's "The Grifter's Hymnal" - you'll experience no misfortune. Instead, you'll take a walk down some rough roads with a ruffian who'll regale you with his compelling stories of badass women rockers, car thieves and legendary blues musicians that make up the musical DNA of your traveling companion. Joined by his son, Lucas, on lead guitar, Gabe Rhodes on guitar, Rick »»»
The Grifter's Hymnal CD review - The Grifter's Hymnal
Ray Wylie Hubbard salutes several of his musical influences on his latest release, with his usual biting humor and social commentary also intact. Music is a recurring theme in many of the songs beginning with the opening track Coricidin Bottle ("Said my prayers to the old black gods") in which he pays homage to the blues legends that inspired him early in his career. In South of the River, Hubbard makes reference to Joe Walsh's early band the James Gang, while Hen House not only »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Womack planned a good night – Lee Ann Womack pretty much summed up where she's at these days in concluding her show with Don Williams "Lord I Hope This Day Is Good." The ever-strong voiced country traditionalist sang, "I don't need fortune and I don't need fame" with the concluding line of the stanza asking the Man upstairs to "plan a good day for me.... »»»
Concert Review: Cantrell continues to satisfy – Laura Cantrell may never be a country star. Not at this stage of her career when she's 50, touring here and there and releasing new music every few years or so. But five albums in, Cantrell continues as a warm, enjoyable and worthy purveyor of her brand of country. That would mean going towards a more traditional side, not rushing the songs... »»»
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