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Hubbard visits Dave tonight

Wednesday, January 9, 2013 – Ray Wylie Hubbard performs on Late Show With David Letterman tonight at 11:35 p.m. eastern.

Hubbard will be on TV on the heels of his current album "The Grifter's Hymnal."

CD reviews for Ray Wylie Hubbard

The Ruffian's Misfortune
Make no mistake. When you cue up Ray Wylie Hubbard's new album - a bit of a follow up to 2012's "The Grifter's Hymnal" - you'll experience no misfortune. Instead, you'll take a walk down some rough roads with a ruffian who'll regale you with his compelling stories of badass women rockers, car thieves and legendary blues musicians that make up the musical DNA of your traveling companion. Joined by his son, Lucas, on lead guitar, Gabe Rhodes on guitar, Rick »»»
The Grifter's Hymnal CD review - The Grifter's Hymnal
Ray Wylie Hubbard salutes several of his musical influences on his latest release, with his usual biting humor and social commentary also intact. Music is a recurring theme in many of the songs beginning with the opening track Coricidin Bottle ("Said my prayers to the old black gods") in which he pays homage to the blues legends that inspired him early in his career. In South of the River, Hubbard makes reference to Joe Walsh's early band the James Gang, while Hen House not only »»»
A. Enlightenment B. Endarkenment CD review - A. Enlightenment B. Endarkenment
In case the album cover - on which he's clutching a sword and his own severed head - didn't tip you off, Ray Wylie Hubbard's newest release is a little on the gritty side. Both cover and album are inspired by a quote from 13th century Persian poet Rumi, which states "Behead yourself. Dissolve your whole self into vision: become seeing, seeing, seeing." What Hubbard seems to be seeing here isn't too pretty, but it sure sounds good. On his first album since 2006's »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Hard Working Americans more than live up to moniker – Hard Working Americans is a generic enough sounding term, conveying that you're part of the lunch bucket crowd. Part of a faceless pack instead of an individual. In reality, it's something of a misnomer for the sextet of the same name heretofore considered a side project. That's because they or in most cases, their other... »»»
Concert Review: Wolf rolls on with ease – Peter Wolf starts off his first disc in six years, "A Cure for Loneliness," with "Rolling On." Great title for a song, and as he would prove in concert, he lived up to those words. The song starts "You can lay down and die / You can lay up and count the tears you've cried / But baby, that's not me / There's a... »»»
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