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Griggs releases song remembering Sandy Hook children

Monday, January 7, 2013 – Andy Griggs and hit songwriter Bobby Pinson penned a song dedicated to the families of those affected by the recent tragedy in Newtown, Conn. Proceeds from 20 Little Angels sung by Griggs will be donated to the Sandy Hook School Support Fund managed by the United Way of Western Connecticut.

Griggs and Pinson were grief stricken over the incident. Griggs wrote on his Facebook account, "My eyes have been raining all afternoon. Twenty Little Angels tells of the tragedy and asks questions we all have asked and want to know. How did these sweet, pure, innocent children get 'caught up in someone else's hell?' We do believe these little angels are in heaven now so we tried to put things in perspective by sharing our personal feelings to calm our anger and soothe our grief by writing a song that would bring comfort to us and to all affected by this tragedy."

"There's not enough that can be done for this cause but by downloading this song, everyone's small contribution can make a big difference to the families of these Twenty Little Angels," he said.

The song will be available for download, via iTunes, this week.

"United Way says there will be no fees for the administration of this project," said Griggs. "Even credit card companies have waived their fees for credit transactions benefiting this cause."

The pair met while signed with RCA Records. More than 40 of Pinson's songs found their way onto major albums and 6 were number 1 hits by Toby Keith, Rascal Flatts, Sugarland and Jason Aldean.

Griggs signed with RCA in 1998 and his first album and single by the same name "You Won't Ever Be Lonely" went number 1. He had three albums on RCA, and one on Montage before taking the leap to start his own label, Little Hannel Records.

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Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: AmericanaFest 2016: The Week In Review – Where to begin? The AmericanaFest can be described in many ways - entertaining, enlightening and - to be absolutely honest - exhausting. But mostly it's amazing. Six days of shows, showcases, discussions and seminars involving the brightest lights in Americana music, among them, both superstars (Emmylou Harris, Jim Lauderdale, Sam Bush, Rodney... »»»
Concert Review: Just another Saturday night for Paisley – Crank up the music, especially the guitar, combine rock and country on the more traditional side on a bunch of generally fun songs, and that's just another Saturday night for Brad Paisley. Paisley pretty much demonstrated his sentiments of how the night would go, starting with the commercially ready "Crushin It" and "American Saturday Night.... »»»
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