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Auldridge passes away

Saturday, December 29, 2012 – Mike Auldridge, a leading resophonic player and member of the Seldom Scene, died this morning, 1 day short of his 74th birthday in Silver Spring, Md. of cancer.

Born in Washington, D.C., Auldridge began playing guitar at 13 with Josh Graves a key influence. Graves also sold him his first Dobro. A graphic artist, Auldridge started playing music full-time when his employer, the Washington Star-News, folded in 1976.

Auldridge was a founding member of the Seldom Scene, a leading bluegrass band in the Washington area. He also played with Darren Beachley and The Legends of the Potomac bluegrass band, Emerson and Waldron, Cliff Waldron and the New Shades of Grass, Chesapeake and John Starling and Carolina Star, which featured three original members of The Seldom Scene. He also toured with Lyle Lovett and Emmylou Harris.

CD reviews for Seldom Scene

Different Roads CD review - Different Roads
From its inception in the early 1970s, the Seldom Scene has been one of the most consistently interesting and quietly progressive bands in modern bluegrass. This 14-track compilation highlights the band's classic original lineup of mandolinist John Duffey, guitarist John Starling, Dobro star Mike Auldridge, banjoist Ben Eldridge (the lone original member in today's roster) and bassist Tom Gray. The puzzling thing about this compilation is why it exists. The Seldom Scene released 8 »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Jarosz brings the cheer – Sarah Jarosz justifiably was in good spirits. After all, she just released her brand new "Undercurrent" disc about 10 days prior. And she was coming home in a way as she went to college in the Boston area. Plus, she packed the club in a near sell-out gig. The good cheer extended to her music as well in a varied, change-it-up set that... »»»
Concert Review: Outlaw lives up to his name – If you're a country singer, and you use the name Outlaw as your last name, well, you'd better back it up. Los Angeles-based traditional honky tonker Sam Outlaw set the record straight, though, saying he was "going to confront it head on." He told the crowd of 45 at his Boston-area debut that he took his mom's maiden name at his stage name.... »»»
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