Sign up for newsletter
 

Lynch, Trischka, Ickes win honors

Monday, December 3, 2012 – Claire Lynch, Tony Trischka and Rob Ickes are among 54 artists to receive one of 50 USA Fellowships from United States Artists (USA). The national advocacy organization awarded unrestricted grants of $50,000 today.

Those honored come from the fields of architecture and design, crafts and traditional arts, dance, literature, media, music, theater arts, and visual arts.

Out of the 54 winners, only seven are in the music field.

Lynch has long been recognized as a creative force in acoustic music and at the forefront of women who have expanded the bluegrass genre. She has twice earned The International Bluegrass Music Association's "Female Vocalist of the Year" title, and two Grammy nominations.

"On a personal level, the award fuels my confidence and creativity and inspires me to take my work to new levels," said Lynch. "I'm in the studio recording a new album right now and the thrill of being selected is bringing an incredible energy to the sessions."

Lynch's encompasses classic bluegrass and infusions of contemporary folk, country, rock and swing. Her songs have been recorded by Kathy Mattea, Patty Loveless and others.

Lynch released 7 albums through Rounder Records, where she enjoyed an 18-year collaboration with label founder Ken Irwin. Currently, she is recording a new album to be released in 2013 on roots label Compass Records. Ickes has long considered a premier Dobro player while Trischka plays banjo.

More news for Claire Lynch

CD reviews for Claire Lynch

Dear Sister CD review - Dear Sister
Claire Lynch covers a lot of ground . Doin' Time is full of woe, the story of someone running from life and weary of the trip. Here, and at other points throughout the CD, bassist Mark Schatz uses a bow, adding a pleasant bottom end to the music though a bow-and-bass combination tends to cause some raised eyebrows at bluegrass shows. Some will argue that a bass unplucked just isn't bluegrass. On the subject of bluegrass, the only number that has a traditional bluegrass sound is the »»»
Whatcha Gonna Do CD review - Whatcha Gonna Do
Claire Lynch is one of the finest singers in acoustic music. That's been the case for more than 25 years. Her vocal twang both soothes and captures your attention. A multiple IBMA award winner, her music spans beyond bluegrass, though she can mix it up bluegrass-style as well as anyone, as evidenced here by Barbed Wire Boys and Bill Monroe's My Florida Sunshine. Widow's Weeds has a strong bluegrassy and old timey flavor to it as well. Though a terrific songwriter and »»»
Crowd Favorites CD review - Crowd Favorites
Claire Lynch's talents as a singer, songwriter and band leader are showcased on this compilation disc of 10 songs from her catalogue and new recordings of favorites by her Front Porch String Band. "Sweetheart Darlin' of Mine" and "If Wishes Were Horses" are bluegrass tunes with elegant breaks and tight vocal harmonies. In "Train Long Gone," the group sets the stage by clueing the listener to the next line. It's a new take on more traditional tunes where »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: 19 years later, Harris returns with "Wrecking Ball" – At one point, Emmylou Harris told the crowd that she could not believe it had been 19 years since she released "Wrecking Ball." That was most understandable because based on this concert tour devoted towards playing the left of center atmospheric disc, the song bird has hardly missed a beat. Harris' label, Nonesuch, just released a... »»»
Concert Review: Hurray for the Riff: more than just a great name – Hurray for the Riff Raff is one well-named group. Not that it signifies all that much musically, but at least it's catchy and makes you want to root for the underdog. With a lot to live up moniker wise, the band in concert - which, in reality, is lead singer Alynda Lee Segarra from New Orleans and her backing mates - more than lived up to the "pressure.... »»»
Subscribe to Country News Digest Country News Digest      Follow Country Standard Time on twitter CST      Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook CST

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Gerry House comes out (from behind the mic) For 25 years, Gerry House spent every weekday morning in people's living rooms. As the host of the much-loved and much-acclaimed morning show, Gerry House and the House Foundation, House reigned on the airwaves on Nashville's WSIX-FM from 1983-2010, taking a brief hiatus to work for WSM-AM in Nashville and for KLAC in Los Angeles.... »»»
Once a Carter Girl, always a Carter Girl Expectations of being a "Carter Girl" - the way Carlene Carter refers to herself with her latest album title - must be extremely daunting at times. "It's as difficult as you want to make it," Carter explains. "I've always just embraced the fact that I was born into this family and very proud to be part of it." However, much like her mother, June Carter Cash, Carlene has always been a free spirit and fiercely individualistic. ... »»»
Loveless goes "Somewhere Else" To take a page from Judy Collins' notebook, Lydia Loveless has seen life from both sides now. After a childhood in tiny Coshocton, Ohio, a move to Columbus and a gig playing bass in her family's new wave/rock band as a teenager, Loveless set out on her own musical path at the age of 17. In 2010, the 20-year-old Loveless released her debut album, "The Only Man," which was critically acclaimed but just barely heard by the general public.... »»»
Carter Girl CD review - Carter Girl

It might have been easier, and certainly less emotionally taxing, had Carlene Carter just recorded a batch of Carter Family songs using vocal muscle memory alone. However, as soon as you hear Carter describing the losses of loved ones during "Lonesome Valley," you realize right away this is not just some sort of capitalization on a revered family name. It's a personal testimony. »»»

Where It All Began CD review - Where It All Began
Dan + Shay debut with a likable disc, if your bent is the Rascal Flatts world of country. In fact, Dan Smyers of Pittsburgh and Shay Mooney of Arkansas come mighty close to mimicking the longstanding country stars with the biggest difference that they're a duo and Rascal Flatts is a trio. Perhaps the similarities ought come as no surprise because the duo started writing the day after they met in Nashville in December 2012. Guess who placed their first song on hold? Rascal Flatts. »»»
Turn It Up CD review - Turn It Up
Josh Thompson's sophomore release, "Turn It Up" is his first on Toby Keith's Show Dog label. It seems to be a good match because both artists are cut from the same cloth. Thompson is also known as a champion of the everyman. Turns out they both have the same tendency to go over the top. Thompson excessively showcases the blue collar lifestyle the way Keith champions patriotism. »»»