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Brice goes home again

Wednesday, November 28, 2012 – Lee Brice went back to his roots for his first hometown arena show this weekend before rivalry weekend's Clemson versus South Carolina game.

On Friday night at Littlejohn Coliseum, the former Clemson Tiger football player revved up fans for the game with the help of Clemson's marching band, closing the night with Orange Empire, the fight song that Brice wrote and recorded as the team's game day anthem.

"We had a blast this weekend in Clemson...even though our guys didn't take the win," said Brice. "I've been wanting to play at the Clemson versus South Carolina game for years, so I knew we had to do something exciting to surprise all our hometown fans...the band did a great job helping me pull that off. We were all on fire straight through watching the guys run down the hill to Orange Empire. It was a really cool moment for me as a former player, a musician and a fan."

Brice is scheduled for two additional upcoming pre-game concerts this football season. He will kick off the ACC Championship game in Charlotte, N.C. on Dec. 1 and the Sun Bowl in El Paso, Texas on New Year's Eve.

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I Don't Dance CD review - I Don't Dance
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Hard to Love CD review - Hard to Love
Lee Brice had a dream run of success with his debut, "Love Like Crazy" - the title track became the most-played song on country radio in 2010. While that set the South Carolina native up for a doozy of a sophomore slump, he sidesteps it with ease. Brice simply has too many weapons - a songwriter's ear, soulful voice and some very able co-writer friends (Rhett Atkins, Eric Church) to veer far off course. A Woman Like You has already topped the country single charts. »»»
Love Like Crazy CD review - Love Like Crazy
What is now Lee Brice's first long-play record once went by the moniker "Picture of Me," and he still refers to it as the "spiritual title." Along with a song by that name, there are slices of life aplenty about growing up smack dab in the center of South Carolina. For those that didn't have the privilege, it sounds like a whole lot of fun. The showpiece is the title track, which lays out the guidelines to make relationships last and life worthwhile - it's a »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Making perfect sense of Striking Matches, The Secret Sisters – The pairing of Striking Matches and The Secret Sisters on tour makes perfect sense. Both are duos, although the Matches are male/female and the Secrets truly are sisters (Rogers is the name, not Secret). Both emphasize keen vocal interplay. And perhaps most importantly, they shared a very famous producer, T Bone Burnett. But when it came to the live... »»»
Concert Review: Whitehorse changes gears – Whitehorse, the Canadian husband-and-wife duo of Melissa McClelland and Luke Doucet, has changed gears. In years past, they were more on the roots side, but you would have scratched your head wondering where that went during their show at what is billed as a folk club. Only Whitehorse couldn't be accused of being folk oriented either in a tour... »»»
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