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Owens, Flatt and Scruggs, Charles songs enter Grammy hall

Wednesday, November 21, 2012 – Songs by Buck Owens, Flatt and Scruggs, Ray Charles and Ernest Stoneman will be added into the Grammy Hall of Fame.

Paul McCartney, Bob Dylan, James Brown and Elton John are among others who will see their songs inducted.

"With the Grammy Hall of Fame celebrating 40 years, it's especially important to note that these entries continue the tradition of inducting a wide variety of recordings that have inspired and influenced both fans and music makers for generations," Neil Portnow, President and CEO of the Recording Academy, said in a release. "Memorable for being both culturally and historically significant, we are proud to add them to our growing catalog of outstanding recordings that have become part of our musical, social, and cultural history."

The songs are:

Buck Owens, "Act Naturally"
Lester Flatt, Earl Scruggs And The Foggy Mountain Boys, "Foggy Mountain Banjo"
Ray Charles, "Hit The Road Jack"
Ernest V. "Pop" Stoneman, "The Titanic"
Louis Jordan And His Tympany Five, "Ain't Nobody Here But Us Chickens"
Joe Falcon, "Allons A Lafayette"
AC/DC, "Back In Black"
Paul McCartney & Wings, Band On The Run
W.H. Stepp, "Bonaparte's Retreat"
Lennie Tristano Sextet, Crosscurrents
Carols Gardel, "El Dia Que Me Quieras"
Elton John - "Elton John" (CD)
Little Richard, Here's Little Richard
Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton, "Hound Dog"
James Brown, "I Got You (I Feel Good)"
John Coltrane And Johnny Hartman, John Coltrane And Johnny Hartman
Original Broadway Cast, Lost In The Stars
Charles Mingus, Mingus Ah Um
Son House, "My Black Mama [Parts 1 and 2]"
Francis Craig And His Orchestra, "Near You"
The Drifters, "On Broadway"
Billy Joel, "Piano Man"
Memphis Jug Band, "Stealin' Stealin'"
Richard Pryor, That Nigger's Crazy
Frank Sinatra, Theme from "New York, New York"
Bob Dylan, "The Times They Are A-Changin'"
Whitney Houston - "Whitney Houston"

More news for Buck Owens

CD reviews for Buck Owens

Live from Austin, TX
It was hard to find a more significant country artist through the 1960s than Buck Owens. With 21 number ones from 1963 ("Act Naturally," included here) and 1972, including a stretch of 14 in a row, Buck Owens was one of country music's biggest stars, bringing his slant on the Bakersfield Sound to stages, radio and television around the world. In this 1988 Austin City Limits program and nearing 60 years old, Owens appears comfortable with his stature as a torchbearer. »»»
Bound for Bakersfield: 1953-1956 The Complete Pre-Capitol Collection CD review - Bound for Bakersfield: 1953-1956 The Complete Pre-Capitol Collection
Buck Owens had not yet developed the style that would make him a superstar in the '60s when he recorded the songs in this collection for small California labels Pep, Chesterfield and La Brea Records between 1953 and 1956. The Hank Williams influence is heard in the balladBlue Love, Owens' first known recording, as well as early Owens compositions Right After The Dance, Down On The Corner Of Love and It Don't Show On Me. Other impressive Owens compositions are the George Jones »»»
The Warner Bros. Recordings
It's a bit surprising to read the liner notes to a reissue - especially a pricey, deluxe package like those offered by Rhino Handmade - and find not only their author (in this case, veteran country music journalist Rich Keinzle), but the artist as well, more or less suggesting that the music contained therein is second-rate, but that's certainly the impression a reader is left with here. Buck Owens' move in from Capitol - the label with which he'd spent almost all of his »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Richey needn't chase any more – The opening lines of Kim Richey's "Chase Wild Horses," one of the best tracks on her excellent new CD, "Edgeland," starts with the lines: "I don't chase wild horses any more/I'm all done running from the way I was before Things I've done that I ain't proud of / I can't even stand the sound of I... »»»
Concert Review: Johnson, Mike & the Moonpies show traditional country is alive and well – Cody Johnson is not your typical mainstream country artist. He self-releases his albums, and instead of putting out rock and pop songs (disguised to look country), he records real, diehard Texas country music. And it was heartening to see and hear his loyal Los Angeles fanbase sing along with nearly ever song. His show tonight transformed this former... »»»
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