Sign up for newsletter
 

Owens, Flatt and Scruggs, Charles songs enter Grammy hall

Wednesday, November 21, 2012 – Songs by Buck Owens, Flatt and Scruggs, Ray Charles and Ernest Stoneman will be added into the Grammy Hall of Fame.

Paul McCartney, Bob Dylan, James Brown and Elton John are among others who will see their songs inducted.

"With the Grammy Hall of Fame celebrating 40 years, it's especially important to note that these entries continue the tradition of inducting a wide variety of recordings that have inspired and influenced both fans and music makers for generations," Neil Portnow, President and CEO of the Recording Academy, said in a release. "Memorable for being both culturally and historically significant, we are proud to add them to our growing catalog of outstanding recordings that have become part of our musical, social, and cultural history."

The songs are:

Buck Owens, "Act Naturally"
Lester Flatt, Earl Scruggs And The Foggy Mountain Boys, "Foggy Mountain Banjo"
Ray Charles, "Hit The Road Jack"
Ernest V. "Pop" Stoneman, "The Titanic"
Louis Jordan And His Tympany Five, "Ain't Nobody Here But Us Chickens"
Joe Falcon, "Allons A Lafayette"
AC/DC, "Back In Black"
Paul McCartney & Wings, Band On The Run
W.H. Stepp, "Bonaparte's Retreat"
Lennie Tristano Sextet, Crosscurrents
Carols Gardel, "El Dia Que Me Quieras"
Elton John - "Elton John" (CD)
Little Richard, Here's Little Richard
Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton, "Hound Dog"
James Brown, "I Got You (I Feel Good)"
John Coltrane And Johnny Hartman, John Coltrane And Johnny Hartman
Original Broadway Cast, Lost In The Stars
Charles Mingus, Mingus Ah Um
Son House, "My Black Mama [Parts 1 and 2]"
Francis Craig And His Orchestra, "Near You"
The Drifters, "On Broadway"
Billy Joel, "Piano Man"
Memphis Jug Band, "Stealin' Stealin'"
Richard Pryor, That Nigger's Crazy
Frank Sinatra, Theme from "New York, New York"
Bob Dylan, "The Times They Are A-Changin'"
Whitney Houston - "Whitney Houston"

More news for Buck Owens

CD reviews for Buck Owens

Live from Austin, TX
It was hard to find a more significant country artist through the 1960s than Buck Owens. With 21 number ones from 1963 ("Act Naturally," included here) and 1972, including a stretch of 14 in a row, Buck Owens was one of country music's biggest stars, bringing his slant on the Bakersfield Sound to stages, radio and television around the world. In this 1988 Austin City Limits program and nearing 60 years old, Owens appears comfortable with his stature as a torchbearer. »»»
Bound for Bakersfield: 1953-1956 The Complete Pre-Capitol Collection CD review - Bound for Bakersfield: 1953-1956 The Complete Pre-Capitol Collection
Buck Owens had not yet developed the style that would make him a superstar in the '60s when he recorded the songs in this collection for small California labels Pep, Chesterfield and La Brea Records between 1953 and 1956. The Hank Williams influence is heard in the balladBlue Love, Owens' first known recording, as well as early Owens compositions Right After The Dance, Down On The Corner Of Love and It Don't Show On Me. Other impressive Owens compositions are the George Jones »»»
The Warner Bros. Recordings
It's a bit surprising to read the liner notes to a reissue - especially a pricey, deluxe package like those offered by Rhino Handmade - and find not only their author (in this case, veteran country music journalist Rich Keinzle), but the artist as well, more or less suggesting that the music contained therein is second-rate, but that's certainly the impression a reader is left with here. Buck Owens' move in from Capitol - the label with which he'd spent almost all of his »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Kristofferson gives insight, but no easy answers – When they say music gets better with age, they're not always just talking about songs alone; sometimes they're also referring to the listener. When Kris Kristofferson sings, "Well, I woke up Sunday morning/With no way to hold my head that didn't hurt," to smartly open "Sunday Mornin' Comin' Down," he... »»»
Concert Review: No sugarcoating, Welch dishes out an experience – Gillian Welch (accompanied, as always, by master guitarist David Rawlings), celebrated her "The Harrow & The Harvest" album with a powerful night of music. She apologized many times for the utter unhappiness expressed through this album's songs, admitting it's "not the most chipper album" at one point.... »»»
Subscribe to Country News Digest Country News Digest      Follow Country Standard Time on twitter CST      Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook CST

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Hillman bides his time Legends don't come any more legendary than Chris Hillman. The roll call of bands that comprises Hillman's half century in music reads like a wing exhibit at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame; Byrds, Flying Burrito Brothers, Manassas, the Souther Hillman Furay Band, the Desert Rose Band,... »»»
The Cadillac Three creates its "Legacy" William Shakespeare noted a few centuries back that a rose by any other name would be equally aromatic, and that general idea has musical implications as well. The Cadillac Three knows a thing or two about maintaining a sonic identity after a name change;... »»»
With Stanley and Watson, sound isn't elementary Those aware of the late Owsley "Bear" Stanley likely know him for one of two reasons - his pioneering work manufacturing lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in San Francisco during the mid-to-late 1960s and his role as an innovative sound engineer. Most notably, Bear worked...... »»»
When Was the Last Time CD review - When Was the Last Time
Darius Rucker is so darn likeable, he likely gets away with creating subpar music more than most. However, "When Was the Last Time" is a consistently good album, which is as respectable as it is likeable. »»»
Losing Sleep CD review - Losing Sleep
Chris Young has one of the best country voices, and it's always a pleasure to hear him sing. But it's disappointing when the title cut sounds more like the groove to a Justin Bieber song than anything truly country.  »»»
A Long Way From Your Heart CD review - A Long Way From Your Heart
The name Turnpike Troubadours suggests traveling music. Strap yourself in and get ready for an exhilarating ride. This Oklahoma-based roots-rock unit soars on its fourth release. Not to diminish the strong songwriting from leader Evan Felker, it's the band's pulsating musicianship with an array of electric instruments combined with fiddle and pedal steel that makes the sound so arresting. »»»
First Cigarette CD review - First Cigarette
The stunning vocal of Travis Meadows on the opening track, "Sideways," brims with honesty, pain and hard-earned wisdom as he offers a blend of confession and advice, stimulated by an experience at an adolescent addiction treatment center. Meadows, like many, is one of those Nashville songwriters ("Riser" for Dierks Bentley and "What We Ain't Got" for Jake Owen), but is finding his own voice relatively late in life. »»»
The Long Awaited Album CD review - The Long Awaited Album
When last we visited a new album from Steve Martin & the Steep Canyon Rangers, 2011's "Rare Bird Alert," we found a cohesive, focused collection of bluegrass; it was an expansive, artistic creation that only benefited the bluegrass community. A subsequent live album (strikingly entitled "Live") presented a continued refinement of this pairing's chemistry.  »»»
Bidin' My Time CD review - Bidin' My Time
With all the memorable music Chris Hillman created with The Byrds, Flying Burrito Brothers and Desert Rose Band, he has nothing left to prove. He's a both a bona fide rock and country icon. Tom Petty, who owes an obvious debt to Hillman's...  »»»