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Miller/Lauderdale slate tour dates

Monday, November 19, 2012 – Buddy Miller and Jim Lauderdale announced tour dates today in support of their new country duets record "Buddy and Jim."

The two friends will play a sold out Music City Roots show, this Wednesday Nov. 21 and appear on The Grand Ole Opry at the Ryman Auditorium on Saturday, Dec. 15 before boarding the Cayamo Cruise in January. Official tour dates begin Feb. 1 taking them through major cities including Washington DC, Philadelphia, New York City and eventually back home to Nashville for a show at Mercy Lounge on March 1.

"Buddy and Jim" will be available via New West Records on CD and limited edition vinyl on Black Friday (Nov. 23) at independent record stores taking part in Record Store Day's Back To Black Friday promotion, followed by a worldwide release everywhere else music is sold on Dec. 11. The two recently sat down at Buddy's home studio, where the record was made, to talk about their friendship, history, song writing and how the album came together. This bonus material is available to watch at Facebook.com/BuddyandJimRadioShow by clicking the "Watch & Listen" tab where a free download of their version of The Train That Carried My Gal From Town and a stream of the original song I Lost My Job Of Loving You are also available.

Lauderdale and Miller are longtime friends and frequent musical collaborators on stage and in the studio. They join forces annually for the Americana Honors and Awards show, which Lauderdale hosts while Miller leads the all-star band.

Songs on the CD are:

I Lost My Job Of Loving You
The Train That Carried My Gal From Town
That's Not Even Why I Love You
Down South In New Orleans
It Hurts Me
Vampire Girl
Forever And A Day
Lonely One In This Town
Looking For A Heartache
I Want To Do Everything For You
The Wobble

Tour dates are:

Nov. 21 Nashville Music City Roots
Dec. 15 Nashville The Grand Ole Opry
Jan. 13-20 Cayamo Cruise www.cayamo.com
Feb. 1 Louisville, KY Headliners
Feb. 2 Bowling Green, KY Warehouse @ Mt. Victor
Feb. 19 Alexandria, VA Birchmere
Feb. 21 New York Bowery Ballroom
Feb. 22 PhiladelphiaA World Cafe Live
Feb. 24 Charleston, WV Mountain Stage
Feb. 25 Ann Arbor, MI The Arc
Feb. 27 Chicago Lincoln Hall
March 1 Nashville Mercy Lounge

More dates will be added.

More news for Jim Lauderdale

CD reviews for Jim Lauderdale

Soul Searching CD review - Soul Searching
Jim Lauderdale is a prolific artist with a penchant for exploring musical styles. Listeners never know which direction he will go from album to album, with the sole consistencies his ability to craft a good song and his identifiable voice. He doesn't disappoint on this double album divided by the geographical and musical differences between Memphis and Nashville. Volume 1 was recorded in Memphis, and the music is appropriately heavily influenced by soul and R&B. Both albums feature the »»»
I'm A Song CD review - I'm A Song
In promoting "I'm a Song," Jim Lauderdale put out a satirical video with his band in which he dons a trucker's cap and celebrates the creation of "bro-grass." The good-natured video served to show how Lauderdale doesn't fit in with what's most popular in Nashville these days, but listen to his latest - a wonderful, 20-song album - and you know the in-demand songwriter certainly can't be that unpopular. Lauderdale had a hand in writing each song here »»»
Blue Moon Junction CD review - Blue Moon Junction
As 2013 drew to a close, Jim Lauderdale simultaneously released "Blue Moon Junction" and "Black Roses," albums that - quality aside - could not be more dissimilar. Both co-written with Robert Hunter, their fifth and sixth such collaboration, "Blue Moon Junction" is Lauderdale performing solo, just acoustic guitar and voice. With such an effective presentation, one wonders why Lauderdale never before elected to present himself in such an unadorned fashion. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Alabama Shakes, Elvis celebrate music – Donald Trump was nowhere to be seen at the final day of the Newport Folk Festival, but that didn't mean he was ignored. Maybe it was the political roots of folk music. The Republican presidential candidate was mentioned at least three times - all by foreign musicians - during the finale. No one exactly endorsed his candidacy either.... »»»
Concert Review: Newport Folk Fest retains its beauty – With acts ranging from Ray LaMontagne to The Staves to Case/Lang/Veirs, the Newport Folk Festival ran the gamut from tried and true to not so well known to brand new (sort of) acts. And that was the beauty of day one of the festival in enabling attendees to sample a wide range of music and genres, albeit little of it folk as we once knew it.... »»»
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