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Jones announces final Nashville show

Monday, November 12, 2012 – George Jones announced the final Nashville show as part of The Grand Tour to be held at Bridgestone Arena in Nashville on Friday, Nov. 22.

Special guest Tanya Tucker will be on hand for the Nashville concert amongst other friends of The Possum, yet to be announced.

"The Grand Tour will have surprises throughout the shows - you never know who may show up. The Possum has lots of friends so it is going to be the most exciting thing to see who shows up during the final show. You should come too - and we can be surprised together," said Jones.

Jones will mark the end of an era with 2013's farewell tour titled "The Grand Tour." The tour is expected to make approximately 60 stops next year.

Tickets for the Nashville show go on-sale Friday, Nov. 16 at 10 a.m. at all Ticketmaster locations.

Tour dates are:
Nov. 9 - Branson, MO - The Mansion Theatre
Nov. 10 - Morton, MN - Jackpot Junction Casino
Nov. 16 - Peoria, IL - Peoria Civic Center
Nov. 17 - Hiawassee, GA - Anderson Music Hall
Nov. 23 - Winnie, TX - Nutty Jerry's Winnie Arena
Nov. 24 - Bossier City, LA - Horseshoe Casino
Dec. 1 - Elizabeth, IN - Horseshoe Casino
Dec. 15 - Jackson, TN - Carl Perkins Civic Center
Feb. 2 - Tunica, MS - Sam's Town
Feb. 7 - Lakeland, FL - Youkey Theater
Feb. 22 - Greenville, TX - Greenville Memorial Auditorium
Feb. 23 - Forrest City, AR - East Arkansas Community College
March 15 - Joliet, IL - Realto Square Theater
March 16 - Muncie, IN - Emens Auditorium
March 22 - Chattanooga, TN - Memorial Auditorium
April 5 - Fairfax, VA - Patriot Center
April 6 - Knoxville, TN - Knoxville Coliseum
April 19 - Atlanta, GA - Fox Theater
April 20 - Salem, VA - Salem Civic Center
April 27 - Huntsville, AL - Mark C. Smith Concert Hall
May 17 - Charlottesville, VA - John Paul Jones Arena
May 18 - Spartanburg, SC - Memorial Auditorium
June 1 - North Tonawanda, NY - Riviera Theater
June 2 - Lancaster, PA - American Music Theater
Nov. 9 - Grant, OK - Choctaw Event Center

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CD reviews for George Jones

The Hits CD review - The Hits
George Jones tends to rely on his past these days, so it's not surprising that "The Hits" is his new CD. The 24-song set does include a few previously unreleased songs, but that may not be enough to persuade all but the diehards to buy this. Jones recorded Eddy Raven's I Should Have Called and Al Anderson-Steven Bruton's I Ain't Ever Slowing Down about five years ago with Keith Stegall producing, and both appear here for the first time. The former is a bit poppy, »»»
Step Right Up 1970-1979: A Critical Anthology CD review - Step Right Up 1970-1979: A Critical Anthology
As retrospectives go, this new 28-track collection of George Jones' work from the 1970s is a bit of an anomaly. While most other compilations present chart-topping singles in chronological order, this single-disc set from the Australian reissue specialists at Raven Records provides an overview of Jones' total artistic output for the entire decade, regardless of chart position. This approach works well in this case because it covers songs not usually included on George Jones compilations. »»»
George Jones: Burn Your Playhouse Down, the unreleased duets CD review - George Jones: Burn Your Playhouse Down, the unreleased duets
There are few revelations in this George Jones duets collection culled primarily from "The Bradley Barn Sessions" (1993 recordings). Producers have their reasons. Perhaps the biggest surprise is when Jones is outsung by one of his duet partners, Georgette Jones, the only child of his marriage to Tammy Wynette. Georgette may have the best singing genes in history, but it is time as much as anything that pushes Dad into a subordinate role on You and Me and Time. The revelation, then, is a »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Daniels wears out bows, but music endures – After each of the first few songs Charlie Daniels played, his 'fiddle tech (?)' exchanged his bow. Is this because he was playing particularly hard? Perhaps. Whatever the case, Daniels and his five-piece band clearly appeared to be giving it their all during the act's hour-and-a-half set. As it is the Christmas month, Daniels sang a... »»»
Concert Review: Rawlings easily moves out of the shadow – Every once in awhile David Rawlings moves out of the shadow of musical mate Gillian Welch to launch his own tour. While Welch, for whom Rawlings plays guitar, has the more prominent career, nights like this ably confirm that there is a reason does his own thing as well. Rawlings, who released the very fine "Poor David's Almanack" in... »»»
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