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Chesney McGraw, Keith take early CMA honors

Thursday, November 1, 2012 – Kenny Chesney, Tim McGraw and Toby Keith were early winners from the Country Music Association Awards on Thursday.

Winning CMA Musical Event of the Year was Chesney's duet with McGraw, Feel Like A Rock Star. This marked second time McGraw has won a CMA Award for a collaboration with Chesney. The two received CMA Vocal Event of the Year Awards for their work on Tracy Lawrence's Find Out Who Your Friends Are (2007).

Taking the CMA Music Video of the Year was Keith and director Michael Salomon for Red Solo Cup. This is Keith's third win from a total of 28 nominations.

The winners were announced live on "Good Morning America" from New York's Times Square this morning.

"What a great way to lead up to 'Country Music's Biggest Night' by announcing our winners on Good Morning America and sharing the news with the GMA viewers and the fans here in Nashville," said Steve Moore, Chief Executive Officer of CMA.

The two categories announced on "Good Morning America" are normally presented during pre-televised activities and acknowledged during the CMA Awards broadcast, which will happen again this year. Two-time CMA Awards nominee Love and Theft will host pre-television ceremonies tonight and will present the trophies to the winners as well as Musician of the Year and the CMA Broadcast Awards winners for Radio Station and Personality of the Year. The recipients will be acknowledged during the broadcast.

The remaining 10 awards will be handed out tonight in Nashville. Hosted for the fifth time by Brad Paisley and Carrie Underwood, The 46th Annual CMA Awards is at 8 p.m. from the Bridgestone Arena on ABC.

More news for Tim McGraw

CD reviews for Tim McGraw

Damn Country Music CD review - Damn Country Music
Tim McGraw said of his 14th studio album, "Damn Country Music," "It's is all about passion, (taking him back to 1989) "when I came to Nashville to chase my dreams." Country music has richly rewarded him over the past two decades, and he honors the genre's tradition here. The album gets off to a very traditional start with Celtic folk. The flute and skillful acoustic picking on the opener "Here Tonight" bring a Mark Knopfler tune immediately to mind. »»»
Sundown Heaven Town CD review - Sundown Heaven Town
The banjo comes first out of the speakers, the opening strains of "Overrated," the lead-off song on Tim McGraw's latest. But with a "1-2-3-4" count, the mood changes and goes for a more modern country approach. McGraw does about the same on the follow-up "City Lights" with Michael Landau's steely, but rocking lead guitar taking over near the conclusion as it does later hard on "Sick of Me" where the protagonist contemplates a need to turn his life around. »»»
Two Lanes of Freedom CD review - Two Lanes of Freedom
Tim McGraw's debut on Big Machine, "Two Lanes Of Freedom" is his first record since the announcement that he gave up alcohol five years ago and the first since his acrimonious, litigious split from the only label he had ever known, Curb. The new CD literally and symbolically represents a fresh start. If only the material better reflected his new take on life. What is presented here is about as boiler plate as contemporary country gets. The album is a safe play and takes almost no chances. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Blackberry Smoke, The Cadillac Three rock it – If you didn't know Blackberry Smoke appeals to Southern rock fans, the guy wearing the 'F-ing Skynyrd shirt might have given you a clue. But when Duane Betts, son of Allman Brothers guitarist Dicky Betts, took the stage to play the Allmans' "Blue Sky," there was no doubt. This was a night of loud electric guitars, always... »»»
Concert Review: McGraw, Hill keep it fresh and relevant – Tim McGraw singing his emotional "Live Like You Were Dying" has been the cathartic capstone of the country singer's concerts for over a decade now. This principle held true again during the latter part of McGraw's performance with wife Faith Hill during a stop on their Soul2Soul tour. At one point while singing it, McGraw humbly... »»»
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