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Swift enjoys huge week on chart

Thursday, October 11, 2012 – Taylor Swift had a huge week on the Billboard singles chart. We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together skyrocketed all the way from 21 to 1st on the Billboard Country Song chart for the week ending Oct. 20. Swift was not done there as the title track of her upcoming "Red" CD debuted in second. Begin Again had a huge leap as well from 37 to 10.

On the Country Albums chart, Little Big Town remained first with "Tornado."

Swift knocked out Jason Aldean on the song chart as Take a Little Ride slid to fifth. Carrie Underwood was third with Blown Away, while Hunter Hayes' Wanted was fourth.

Florid Georgia Line was also a big mover with Cruise jumping from 19 to 6. Brad Paisley moved from 23 to 17 with Southern Comfort Zone. Gary Allan's new single Every Storm (Runs Out of Rain) jumped from 36 to 20.

Underwood was second on the albums chart with "Blown Away." Luke Bryan was third with "tailgates & tanlines." Hayes was fourth with his self-titled debut. Eric Church was fifth with "Chief." Blake Shelton debuted in sixth with "Cheers, It's Christmas." Josh Turner moved from 11 to 8 with "Live Across America." Jerrod Niemann debuted in ninth with "Free the Music."

The Band Perry jumped 10 to 23 with its self-titled debut. Florida Georgia Line was up 3 to 24 with "It'z Just What We Do." Shelton was up 3 to 25 with "Red River Blue." Johnny Cash's "The Greatest: The Number Ones" was at 35, up 3.

On the Bluegrass Albums chart, Old Crow Medicine Show stayed first with "Carry Me Back." Trampled By Turtles was second with "Stars and Satellites." Punch Brother jumped from 10th to 3rd with "Who's Feeling Young Now?" Ricky Skaggs and Kentucky Thunder were fourth with "Music to My Ears." "The Gospel Side of Dailey & Vincent" was fifth.

On the overall top 200 chart, Little Big Town was 8th, Underwood 30th, Bryan 35th, Hayes 41st and Church 43rd.

More news for Taylor Swift

CD reviews for Taylor Swift

Journey to Fearless DVD
Part Behind The Music style documentary and part concert film, Taylor Swift's new Blu-ray release offers an interesting hybrid approach to the typical live performance video - an approach that hits more than it misses. "Journey To Fearless" focuses on Swift's meteoric rise from aspiring grade-school singer/songwriter to award-winning country and pop megastar while sprinkling in live performances. Hardcore Swift fans will find a lot to love on this single-disc set (which is also »»»
Speak Now CD review - Speak Now
Taylor Swift has made the best CD of her young career with her fourth CD. The biggest difference is that Swift's singing, spotty on previous releases and live performances, is far far superior here. Swift wrote all 14 songs here, which like her other albums tend to deal with relationships that have gone south. Swift's songwriting always has been one of her strengths, and that continues to be the case here - both lyrically and musically. Put simply, Swift knows a lot about penning »»»
Fearless CD review - Fearless
Taylor Swift took the county world by storm with her huge selling debut and its five hit singles. With a huge marketing push and myspace, Swift was on her way. Kind of like an Avril Lavigne for the teen female country set. Sophomore slump? There's no indication of that. Swift once again writes her material - all 13 songs here with help sometimes from Liz Rose, Colbie Caillat and John Rich. Swift writes of what she knows about - relationships and teen love come and gone in songs speak to her fans. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Surly Gentlemen prove anything but – For about the past six months, veteran bluegrassers Clay Hess, formerly of Kentucky Thunder, and Tim Shelton of NewFound Road, along with Clay's son Brennan, have collectively been The Surly Gentlemen. The trio's sound is probably best described as stripped down bluegrass meets singer/songwriter. These Surly Gents have been playing small... »»»
Concert Review: Dustbowl Revival leads just another typical night in Music City – The Station Inn is Nashville's self-styled "World Famous" venue for bluegrass and roots music for over 40 years. Over time, the area around The Station Inn (much like the rest of Nashville) has changed, swapping gritty and sweaty for shiny and slick. The area, known as The Gulch, now features shopping and restaurants, with little of the... »»»
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