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Pickler signs with Black River

Monday, October 8, 2012 – Kellie Pickler signed a new record deal with Black River Entertainment after three albums on RCA.

"In looking for a label partner, I was really drawn to the Black River family because they hold similar values that I do," said Pickler. "From our initial meeting, it was clear to me how much the entire team respects the artists' musical vision, and I'm really looking forward to getting back into the studio to record and release new music to country radio."

"What's not to love about Kellie?" asks Gordon Kerr, CEO of Black River Entertainment. "She's real, she adores her fans, she's rooted in and committed to country music and she's genuine. How can you ask for more than that?"

Hailing from Albemarle, N.C., Pickler signed with 19/BNA Records in 2006 and released her debut album, "Small Town Girl." The album sold more than 800,000 copies worldwide and produced three singles, Red High Heels, I Wonder and Things That Never Cross a Man's Mind.

In 2008, Pickler released her self-titled sophomore record featuring country radio hits Don't You Know You're Beautiful, Best Days of Your Life (Pickler's first Top 10 and Taylor Swift co-write) and Didn't You Know How Much I Loved You.

Pickler co-wrote 6 of the 11 tracks on this year's more traditional sounding "100 Proof," but the album failed to yield any hits. Tough reached 30 on the charts and a follow-up single, the title track, peaked at 50.

Pickler joins Black River alongside four Craig Morgan, Sarah Darling, Due West and Glen Templeton.

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The Woman I Am CD review - The Woman I Am
High quality music found on Kellie Pickler's "The Woman I Am" evidences how the country singer's last album, "100 Proof," was no fluke. The title track, which Pickler co-wrote with husband Kyle Jacobs, explains how this woman will always have a whole lot of traditional country in her blood. "Sometimes I cry at night/Fall to pieces with Patsy Cline." Many of this 12-song album's best material are also ones Pickler helped pen. They include the »»»
100 Proof CD review - 100 Proof
Until now, Kellie Pickler has become known in country circles more for her bubbly, Dolly Parton-esque personality than for her singing. Granted, she has had some strong singles, notably the autobiographical I Wonder, but one could be forgiven for lumping her in the pile of most former American Idol contestants who hover in and around country music, but never really make an impact. Somewhere after the release of her sophomore album, however, she started mentioning in interviews that she was »»»
Kellie Pickler CD review - Kellie Pickler
At this point, it's a law of television that the results of American Idol are not proportional to post-show success. Past winners are without record contracts, and, among the ranks of former sixth place finishers, Kellie Pickler (aka "Pickles") has gone from waitressing to amassing a handful of pop-country hits at only 22 years old. On her second effort, Pickler spreads her wings beyond vocals to songwriting half the 10 songs. Things kick off with the mighty message song, »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Trampled by Turtles leads stellar night – The animals ruled, for the most part, led by Trampled by Turtles, in a superb trifecta of music long on musicianship and quality songs. Trampled by Turtles, who headlined the sterling bill that also included Elephant Revival and Hurray for the Riff Raff (not animalistic unless the "riff raff" act that way), are going through some major sonic changes.... »»»
Concert Review: Goodnight, Texas gets on the map – Goodnight, Texas is a town with a small population - 28 according to the band's web site. So, if anything is going to put the unincorporated dot on the map, it may be the bi-coastal country band that stole the name. Avi Vinocur, who dwells in San Francisco, and Patrick Dyer Wolf, of North Carolina, are the mainstays of the band with them... »»»
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