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Rucker to join Opry

Tuesday, October 2, 2012 – Darius Rucker received a surprise at the end of his outing at the Grand Ole Opry on Tuesday. Brad Paisley showed up to pop the question.

After Rucker had performed his hits Alright and Don't Think I Don't Think About It as well as his current single True Believers, Rucker agreed to field questions from members of the audience. After answering questions posed by two fans, a third "fan," aka Paisley, appeared in the audience with a two-part question. First question: "Are you still the worst poker player in the world?" Second question: "Would you like to be the newest member of the Grand Ole Opry?"

Managing an "Oh, you're kiddin' me," "Yes, I would" and "Wow," Rucker embraced Paisley, who added, "Welcome him home, everybody. This is his new home right here."

After Rucker performed Wagon Wheel and Paisley performed a set of his own, Rucker returned to the stage saying, "You guys got to share one of the most special nights of my life tonight." Addressing his new Opry family, he added, "Thank you for opening your arms and letting me in."

Rucker will be inducted into the Opry on Tues., Oct. 16. That show will air live on "Noteworthy at the Opry" on GAC at 8 p.m. Central.

"We are extremely excited that Darius will be joining our Opry family," said Opry Vice President and General Manager Pete Fisher. "He's forged an incredible, diverse musical path which has led today to the top of the country charts. It's been clear from the moment Darius first stepped on our stage in 2008 in what high regard he holds the Grand Ole Opry and similarly how much Opry fans love Darius' music. We look forward to him becoming an official Opry member in just a couple of weeks."

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CD reviews for Darius Rucker

Southern Style CD review - Southern Style
Although opener "Homegrown Honey" has a few hip-hip sonic elements fueling it, "Southern Style" is a fairly traditional - well, as traditional as Darius Rucker can get - album. "Homegrown Honey," along with the title cut and "Half Full Dixie Cup," make a play for Rucker's Southern credentials, and for the most part support these claims. Rucker is an easygoing vocalist, and this latest effort goes down smoothly. It's still taboo for country »»»
Home for the Holidays CD review - Home for the Holidays
When it came time for Darius Rucker to throw his hat into the holiday album ring, he was clearly aiming for the old school, traditional realm of such things. The heavy orchestration for these 12 songs hearkens back to the days when crooners like Dean Martin and Frank Sinatra tracked Christmas projects, rather than anything that might pass for country. With that said, though, Rucker represents himself quite well with this traditional album of (mostly) familiar Christmas songs. »»»
True Believers CD review - True Believers
Darius Rucker remains a great singer. He still has that smiling South Carolina party boy delivery that made him Hootie The Hitmaker. His guitarist, J.T. Corenflos, knows how to knock out a solo or two and his producer, Frank Rogers, does admirable work surrounding D-Ruck's voice with just the right amount of compression. So why is this the front runner for Most Boring Country Album of 2013? Well, for starters, the songs suck. The lyrics are so insipid they make the dialogue from a Hannah »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Crowell overcomes The Show That Almost Wasn't – In the memory of those in attendance, it will go down as The Show That Almost Wasn't. The King of Americana, surprisingly strong of voice although physically ragged, Rodney Crowell took to the stage about 90 minutes later than scheduled, and the audience members who persevered were treated to a celebration of song and spirit.... »»»
Concert Review: Earle maintains his value – Steve Earle is always worth seeing live. He's accumulated such a treasure trove of stellar songs over the years, in fact, that he could easily rely on past accomplishments - as so many others do. However, his latest album, "So You Wannabe an Outlaw," is easily one of his best. Therefore, his choice to perform a goodly chunk of this... »»»
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