Sign up for newsletter
 

Gibsons, Sisk & band win IBMA honors

Thursday, September 27, 2012 – The Gibson Brothers won Entertainer of the Year Thursday night at the International Bluegrass Music Association awards in Nashville. The Gibson and Junior Sisk & Ramblers Choice were the only multiple winners of the night.

The night also was a time to remember those who died during the year. The late Earl Scruggs and Doc Watson were remembered by participants. Steve Martin paid tribute to Scruggs with a 30-banjo salute. The IBMA also saluted Doug Dillard and Everett Lilly, bluegrass promoter and actor Andy Griffith, all of whom died in the last year. Watson took guitarist of the year posthumously.

The Gibson won their first entertainer award. They also scored with gospel recorded performance for Singing As We Rise, with Ricky Skaggs.

Sisk & Ramblers Choice won album of the year for "The Heart of a Song" and song of the year for A Far Cry From Lester & Earl.

Russell Moore won male vocalist of the year, Dale Ann Bradley won female vocalist, Joe Mullins & The Radio Ramblers took emerging artist, Blue Highway won vocal group, The Boxcars captured instrumental group, Lonesome River Band won instrumental recorded performance for Angeline The Baker, and St. Jude charity album "Life Goes On" won recorded event.

Rob Ickes (Dobro), Stuart Duncan (fiddle), Sammy Shelor (banjo), Adam Steffey (mandolin) and Marshall Wilborn (bass) won instrumentalist of the year awards.

2012 Bluegrass Hall of Fame inductees Doyle Lawson and Ralph Rinzler also were honored.

The evening ended with the salute to Scruggs. Among those who joined him were J.D. Crowe, Kristin Scott Benson, Sam Bush, show co-host Del McCoury, Lawson, Shelor and Tony Trischka. Scruggs' sons Gary and Randy also participated.

More news for The Gibson Brothers

CD reviews for The Gibson Brothers

In the Ground CD review - In the Ground
The family band is a longstanding conceit of bluegrass and mountain music, including the Carters, the Osbornes, the McReynolds, the Whites, The Stanleys and even the progenitors of bluegrass Bill and Charlie Monroe. The trope continues to the present with The Gibson Brothers carrying on this tradition admirably. The Gibson Brothers, Leigh and Eric, exemplify the power and depth of this music tradition. "In The Ground" cements their position in the bluegrass world. »»»
Brotherhood CD review - Brotherhood
Over the more than 20 years since upstate (way, way upstate) New York natives Eric and Leigh Gibson debuted on the bluegrass scene, it has been more or less de rigueur for the journalists and reviewers who write about them to link them to the long and proud tradition - especially in country music in all its forms - of siblings whose voices combine in mystical ways for some of the most enduring sounds going back more than a century. And while there have been superlative sister acts, from the Carter »»»
They Called It Music CD review - They Called It Music
It's now two full decades since Eric and Leigh Gibson, natives of the farthest reaches of upstate New York (not much more than a couple of stones throws from the Canadian border) debuted on the bluegrass circuit in their early twenties, instantly winning fans with tight harmonies that drew immediate and enthusiastic comparisons to the great tradition of "brother duets" in country music - the Louvins, McReynolds, Delmores, Osbornes, Bollicks (Blue Sky Boys) - well, the list is pretty »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Avett Brothers come home – For the 30th anniversary of the "Traditional Plus" MerleFest music festival, there might not be a more appropriate act to anchor the opening night than the Avett Brothers. Born of a desire to bring rock 'n' roll energy to traditional music and formed by devotees to Doc Watson, The Avetts may have outgrown their acoustic roots over... »»»
Concert Review: Turnpike Troubadours leave no doubt – Turnpike Troubadours have not released an album since mid-September 2015. Don't look for any new release hitting the streets any day now either. The last time the Oklahoma-based band played Boston, they were in a pretty, 1,200-seat theatre. So, one could have been outwardly skeptical about the band when it downsized to a venue on the outskirts... »»»
Subscribe to Country News Digest Country News Digest      Follow Country Standard Time on twitter CST      Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook CST

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

The Avett Brothers come home to MerleFest For The Avett Brothers, MerleFest is a coming home of sorts. This year's edition of the MerleFest "traditional-plus" music festival in Wilkesboro, N.C., the event's 30th anniversary, a milestone sure to be marked by many different special appearances and commemorations during the festival's four-day run, is no exception.... »»»
Gibson Brothers rise up from "In the Ground" There's no more solid live bluegrass show than the Gibson Brothers. They play with great technical skill and crispness. Their harmonies are just what a brother act should be: sweet, true and never forced. Brothers Leigh and Eric Gibson surround themselves with outstanding sidemen with impeccable bluegrass cred: Jesse Brock (mandolin), Mike Barber (bass) and Clayton Campbell on fiddle.... »»»
The Devil Makes Three examine salvation, sin For nearly a decade and a half, The Devil Makes Three has concocted an amazing blend of bluegrass, folk, country, blues, rockabilly and whatever happens to bubble to the surface, and applied it liberally to their songwriting ethic.... »»»
The Harmed Brothers CD review - The Harmed Brothers
Let's put it succinctly. The Harmed Brothers may be the best band no one has ever heard of. Well, maybe that's an exaggeration. They do have their ardent admirers, so let's not discount their following entirely. Still, for those who are unaware, the band's new eponymous effort ought to make it clear that this is a group with a wealth of resources at their command. »»»
West Coast Town CD review - West Coast Town
Chris Shiflett is best known as a guitarist in Foo Fighters, but he's also has some authentic traditional country in his bones. Inspired, in part, by much of the fine vintage country music created in California, "West Coast Town" lets Shiflett show off his country music skills. »»»
Something's Going On CD review - Something's Going On
Trace Adkins' wonderful low singing voice can be a little deceptive because he could easily sing utter crap and still somehow sound great. It's why the critical ear must pay close attention to specifically what he's saying in his songs whenever evaluating his work. Adkins doesn't write his own songs, so he's entirely dependent upon stellar writers.  »»»
Patriots & Poets CD review - Patriots & Poets
From time to time an album comes along with exactly the right message and meaning at exactly the right time - "Patriots & Poets" is one of those albums. Dailey and Vincent initially set out to create a project full of songs they had written independently, together and with close friends. While succeeding mightily in that regard, they also created a beautiful love letter to America and her people... »»»
WildHorse CD review - WildHorse
Someone needs to inform karma that Raelynn is not getting what she deserves. It takes a lot of work to mess this equation up: national TV exposure (from "The Voice"), a monster hit (2014's "God Made Girls") and famous friends who've practically adopted you (like Blake Shelton). This is all atop her twangy Texan charm and very capable singer/songwriter chops. »»»