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Gibsons, Sisk & band win IBMA honors

Thursday, September 27, 2012 – The Gibson Brothers won Entertainer of the Year Thursday night at the International Bluegrass Music Association awards in Nashville. The Gibson and Junior Sisk & Ramblers Choice were the only multiple winners of the night.

The night also was a time to remember those who died during the year. The late Earl Scruggs and Doc Watson were remembered by participants. Steve Martin paid tribute to Scruggs with a 30-banjo salute. The IBMA also saluted Doug Dillard and Everett Lilly, bluegrass promoter and actor Andy Griffith, all of whom died in the last year. Watson took guitarist of the year posthumously.

The Gibson won their first entertainer award. They also scored with gospel recorded performance for Singing As We Rise, with Ricky Skaggs.

Sisk & Ramblers Choice won album of the year for "The Heart of a Song" and song of the year for A Far Cry From Lester & Earl.

Russell Moore won male vocalist of the year, Dale Ann Bradley won female vocalist, Joe Mullins & The Radio Ramblers took emerging artist, Blue Highway won vocal group, The Boxcars captured instrumental group, Lonesome River Band won instrumental recorded performance for Angeline The Baker, and St. Jude charity album "Life Goes On" won recorded event.

Rob Ickes (Dobro), Stuart Duncan (fiddle), Sammy Shelor (banjo), Adam Steffey (mandolin) and Marshall Wilborn (bass) won instrumentalist of the year awards.

2012 Bluegrass Hall of Fame inductees Doyle Lawson and Ralph Rinzler also were honored.

The evening ended with the salute to Scruggs. Among those who joined him were J.D. Crowe, Kristin Scott Benson, Sam Bush, show co-host Del McCoury, Lawson, Shelor and Tony Trischka. Scruggs' sons Gary and Randy also participated.

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CD reviews for The Gibson Brothers

Brotherhood CD review - Brotherhood
Over the more than 20 years since upstate (way, way upstate) New York natives Eric and Leigh Gibson debuted on the bluegrass scene, it has been more or less de rigueur for the journalists and reviewers who write about them to link them to the long and proud tradition - especially in country music in all its forms - of siblings whose voices combine in mystical ways for some of the most enduring sounds going back more than a century. And while there have been superlative sister acts, from the Carter »»»
They Called It Music CD review - They Called It Music
It's now two full decades since Eric and Leigh Gibson, natives of the farthest reaches of upstate New York (not much more than a couple of stones throws from the Canadian border) debuted on the bluegrass circuit in their early twenties, instantly winning fans with tight harmonies that drew immediate and enthusiastic comparisons to the great tradition of "brother duets" in country music - the Louvins, McReynolds, Delmores, Osbornes, Bollicks (Blue Sky Boys) - well, the list is pretty »»»
Help My Brother CD review - Help My Brother
Born less than a year apart, Eric (the elder) and Leigh Gibson aren't quite twins, but from their earliest exposure as twentysomething bluegrass prodigies they've drawn legions of fans for the striking echoes in their vocal sound that hearken back to the classic brother acts of country and bluegrass. They've drawn comparisons to just about everyone from the Louvins to the McReynolds to the Delmores. Now pushing 40, this 10th release from the upstate New York natives finds them »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Jayhawks remain in top form – It's usually a good time to catch a band right after they've released one of their better albums, and "Paging Mr. Proust" is one of The Jayhawks' best. Comprised of smart songs, which consistently put lead singer Gary Louris' engaging vibrato to proper use and instrumental textures that oftentimes stretch the Minnesota act... »»»
Concert Review: Alabama Shakes, Elvis celebrate music – Donald Trump was nowhere to be seen at the final day of the Newport Folk Festival, but that didn't mean he was ignored. Maybe it was the political roots of folk music. The Republican presidential candidate was mentioned at least three times - all by foreign musicians - during the finale. No one exactly endorsed his candidacy either.... »»»
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