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Shelton, Richie again lead charts

Thursday, April 26, 2012 – Lionel Richie and Blake Shelton both continue atop the Billboard charts for the week ending May 5. Richie, once again, has the best selling disc in the U.S. with "Tuskegee," while Shelton's Drink On It leads the country song chart.

Lady Antebellum inched up one to second on the song chart with Dancin' Away With My Heart. Rascal Flatts was third, up two, with Banjo. Miranda Lambert stayed fourth with Over You.Lee Brice's former number one, A Woman Like You, was fifth, down three. Kip Moore broke into the top 10 for the first time with his single, Somethin' 'Bout a Truck, at 9. Springsteen, by Eric Church, was just behind at 10, up 2.

THE FARM's single, Home Sweet Home, rose 3 to 24. So did Love And Theft's Angel Eyes, situated at 26. Thompson Square jumped 5 to 28 with Glass. Dierks Bentley rounded out the top 30 with the biggest jumper - 5-1-5-0 - going from 37 to 30.

On the album chart, Bryan was second with "tailgates & tanlines," changing places with Rascal Flatts' "Changed" in third. Church stayed fourth with "Chief" as did Jason Aldean in fifth with "My Kinda Party."

Hank Williams III debuted at 16 with "Long Gone Daddy." Rodney Atkins was up 6 to 21 with "Take a Back Road." Hunter Hayes' self-titled debut was 23rd. Thompson Square was up 6 to 35 with their self-titled debut. Alan Jackson debuted at 38 with "The Essential Alan Jackson."

On the bluegrass album chart, Trampled By Turtles stayed first with "Stars And Satellites." Punch Brothers stood in second with "Who's Feeling Young Now?," switching spots with Carolina Chocolate Drops' "Leaving Eden." Alison Krauss & Union Station were fourth with "Paper Airplane," one ahead of "The Goat Rodeo Sessions" by Yo-Yo Ma, Stuart Duncan, Edgar Meyer and Chris Thile.

On the overall top 200 chart, Bryan was 10th, Rascal Flatts 13th and Church 18.

More news for Blake Shelton

CD reviews for Blake Shelton

Based on a True Story CD review - Based on a True Story
After Blake Shelton won his first CMA for Best Male Vocalist, he finally began to think he was one of the artists that would influence the direction of country music. If his latest release "Based on a True Story" is any indication, the genre is headed toward records featuring super catchy songs with homogenous themes. Every number has an infectious melody with lead single potential. The trade-off for the sonic pleasantry is a 12-song collection that is short on meaningful material, but long on fun. »»»
Cheers, It's Christmas
For his first Christmas album, Blake Shelton goes for the traditional approach. For a guy that can be a real loose cannon when appearing on The Voice, Blake sure comes off conservative throughout this 14-song collection. Most of these tracks feature full orchestrations, and it sure doesn't sound like any down home holiday celebration. Shelton is at his best, and country-ist, when joined by fellow Okie Reba during the western swinging Oklahoma Christmas. In fact, that classy red head even »»»
Red River Blue CD review - Red River Blue
With the right set of songs, Blake Shelton can sound really great. "Red River Blue" just might be that right set of songs because Shelton has never sounded better. There are moments on this set where Shelton goes country-soul, a la James Otto, most notably with Ready To Roll and Drink On It, and also places where that The Voice guy voices a few power ballads, such as on I'm Sorry. A big part of Shelton's appeal with viewers on The Voice is the way Shelton seems to think and »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Hurray for the Riff: more than just a great name – Hurray for the Riff Raff is one well-named group. Not that it signifies all that much musically, but at least it's catchy and makes you want to root for the underdog. With a lot to live up moniker wise, the band in concert - which, in reality, is lead singer Alynda Lee Segarra from New Orleans and her backing mates - more than lived up to the "pressure.... »»»
Concert Review: Carolina Chocolate Drops easily weather changes – The personnel in the Carolina Chocolate Drops may have changed drastically over the last few years - two of its three founding members are no longer - but that apparently has not had any impact whatsoever on the group both when it comes to the musical direction and the ability to come through in concert. Rhiannon Giddens, who plays fiddle... »»»
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Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

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Carter Girl CD review - Carter Girl

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Turn It Up CD review - Turn It Up
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High Noon CD review - High Noon
Jerrod Niemann's new "High Noon" album is better than the annoying single, "Drink to That All Night," might lead you to believe. Fortunately, the album is not completely a Luke Bryan sound-alike. Even so, there are moments where Niemann sometimes sounds a little too much like his musical contemporaries. »»»
Out Among the Stars CD review - Out Among the Stars
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Summer Number Seventeen CD review - Summer Number Seventeen
Quick, what guy compiled 40 number one country singles, recorded with everybody from Ray Charles to Elvis, but has yet to be enshrined in the Country Music Hall of Fame? Yes, it's Ronnie Milsap, now in his 70s, just like Merle Haggard (who was inducted 20 years ago). Clearly, the ornery outlaws get more attention than the nice guy romantics. And it doesn't help that Milsap has always been interested in many different flavors of music »»»