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Brice, Moore, Stuart lead news releases

Tuesday, April 24, 2012 – With Lee Brice, Kip Moore and Marty Stuart leading the way, today is a busy release day.

Brice has enjoyed a career of hits on his own and as a songwriter. His second disc, "Hard to Love," has a hit already with A Woman Like You, which went to number one. His current single is the title track. Brice has penned hits for Tim McGraw (Still) and Garth Brooks (More Than a Memory).

Moore, who has a hit on his hands with Somethin' 'Bout a Truck, releases his debut "Up All Night." Moore is a Georgia native.

Stuart and The Fabulous Superlatives are out with the 10-song "Nashville, Volume 1: Tear the Woodpile Down." Stuart continues hewing to a more traditional country sound with blues and gospel part of the mix.

Label mates Paul Burch and The Waco Brothers joined forces for "Great Chicago Fire." Both Burch and Jon Langford take lead vocals. The Wacos and Burch also co-produced the music.

Ryan Adams is out with "iTune Sessions." The disc includes eight solo pieces recorded at Capitol Studios in Hollywood, including solo and Whiskeytown material.

A compilation disc, "Mercyland: Hymns For the Rest of Us," was the brainchild of writer and producer Phil Madera. Emmylou Harris, The Civil Wars, Buddy Miller and Carolina Chocolate Drops are among those helping out.

More news for Lee Brice

CD reviews for Lee Brice

I Don't Dance CD review - I Don't Dance
The cover of "I Don't Dance" features a glam shot of Lee Brice standing in a spotlight, looking more like a pop artist than a country singer. Listeners who prefer their country on the gritty side might be scared off by the pretty cover shot. The music matches the image: pop influenced mainstream country music, in the vein of contemporaries Jake Owen and Kip Moore. The success of his sophomore release emboldened Lee Brice. His first two albums introduced the country scene to his »»»
Hard to Love CD review - Hard to Love
Lee Brice had a dream run of success with his debut, "Love Like Crazy" - the title track became the most-played song on country radio in 2010. While that set the South Carolina native up for a doozy of a sophomore slump, he sidesteps it with ease. Brice simply has too many weapons - a songwriter's ear, soulful voice and some very able co-writer friends (Rhett Atkins, Eric Church) to veer far off course. A Woman Like You has already topped the country single charts. »»»
Love Like Crazy CD review - Love Like Crazy
What is now Lee Brice's first long-play record once went by the moniker "Picture of Me," and he still refers to it as the "spiritual title." Along with a song by that name, there are slices of life aplenty about growing up smack dab in the center of South Carolina. For those that didn't have the privilege, it sounds like a whole lot of fun. The showpiece is the title track, which lays out the guidelines to make relationships last and life worthwhile - it's a »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Trampled by Turtles leads stellar night – The animals ruled, for the most part, led by Trampled by Turtles, in a superb trifecta of music long on musicianship and quality songs. Trampled by Turtles, who headlined the sterling bill that also included Elephant Revival and Hurray for the Riff Raff (not animalistic unless the "riff raff" act that way), are going through some major sonic changes.... »»»
Concert Review: Goodnight, Texas gets on the map – Goodnight, Texas is a town with a small population - 28 according to the band's web site. So, if anything is going to put the unincorporated dot on the map, it may be the bi-coastal country band that stole the name. Avi Vinocur, who dwells in San Francisco, and Patrick Dyer Wolf, of North Carolina, are the mainstays of the band with them... »»»
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Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Trampled by Turtles get wild Trampled By Turtles is an indie folk group, an alt.-country band or a bluegrass act - depending on how you choose to look at them. Perhaps it's best to view the outfit as the ultimate combo platter consisting of just about everything that's good about American music. They play wonderfully, yet they also write intelligent songs that draw everyone from Townes Van Zandt to Nirvana to Ralph Stanley. It's all good, and some (or all) of these influences can be spotted in most of Trampled By Turtles' enjoyable sounds.... »»»
Don't try labeling Parker Millsap If you move in alt.-country/Americana circles, you simply cannot get away from the name Parker Millsap. He's certainly one of the biggest buzz artists of 2014. Better still, his self-titled album lives up to all the hype. He's a smart songwriter and a passionate singer and is essential listening for anybody looking for high quality contemporary music. Millsap also creates music appealing to a wide variety of musical tastes. You can make a case that he's a country guy, but you can also hear a lot of blues and folk. And if you attempt to put a label on him, he'll quickly tear it right off.... »»»
Simpson gets metamodern What a difference a year can make. Last year, Sturgill Simpson was overly anxious about the arrival of his debut album, "High Top Mountain." This year, Simpson is simultaneously anticipating the birth of his debut child and his just-released sophomore album, "Metamodern Sounds in Country Music," and his mood couldn't be more relaxed and joyous.... »»»
The Way I'm Livin' CD review - The Way I'm Livin'
Six years later, Lee Ann Womack is finally back. Her traditional country sounds were not quite working with Nashville, which was veering increasingly pop. Now, the Texas native returns with a new label, but the same lovely voice. Originally intended for her old label, MCA Nashville, Womack was given the marching orders to make the type of disc she wanted to listen to. »»»
Three Bells CD review - Three Bells
It must be frustrating to resophonic artists of the stature of these three that even they still have to on occasion answer the question "What is that thing you're playing?" The number of well-known Dobro players has always seemed to lag behind even the banjo, and even in the "Golden Years" of '50s and '60s country music, the only widely known names were Josh Graves and Pete "Brother Oswald" Kirby. »»»
The Earls of Leicester CD review - The Earls of Leicester
In 1946, Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs were integral parts of Bill Monroe's Blue Grass Boys when they recorded a series of singles that most historians of the music consider the "birth of bluegrass" as we know it. Upon leaving to form their own band, The Foggy Mountain Boys (much to Monroe's consternation), they spent most of the 1950s recording one landmark single after another. »»»