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Chesney-McGraw collaboration, "Rockstar," gets played - a lot

Tuesday, April 3, 2012 – Two days after Kenny Chesney and Tim McGraw premiered a new duet, Feel Like a Rock Star, on Sunday's 47th Annual Academy of Country Music Awards, the song is the most-played title on country radio, according to Billboard.

The song was serviced to country radio stations by Chesney's label, BNA, during the ACM broadcast. After the first day of airplay for next week's Hot Country Songs chart, the song was already number 1 with 979 plays and an audience of 7.9 million, according to Nielsen BDS. That put the song far ahead of Lee Brice's A Woman Like You, second with 5.5 million audience impressions.

This is not the tendency on the country chart. Of the top 25 songs on the current chart, 22 were on the chart at least 10 weeks with 10 on for at least 20. The lofty launch of "Rock Star" is almost unprecedented in the 22-year BDS-monitored history of Hot Country Songs, considering the format's conservatism regarding out-of-the-box new music. All but three songs in the current chart's top 25 boast double-digit chart weeks, with 10 each more than 20 weeks old.

The song will be on Chesney's June release, "Welcome to the Fishbowl." McGraw and Chesney are launching the Brothers of the Sun tour in June.

If the airplay continues, Rockstar could become the second country song to debut at the top. Garth Brooks' More Than a Memory debuted at the top the week of Sept. 15, 2007.

More news for Kenny Chesney

CD reviews for Kenny Chesney

Life on a Rock CD review - Life on a Rock
Despite the carefree, cruise-line posture of most Kenny Chesney records, there's always a nagging suspicion that his party-time vibe is about as predictable as a plastic pink flamingo on a Palm Beach patio. Yet Chesney's career-long theme of girls, guitars, beer and beaches (not always in that order) - and the occasional piece of farm machinery - has yet to wear thin. And with summer fast approaching, that's okay. Chesney's latest is something of a running journal of his »»»
Welcome to the Fishbowl CD review - Welcome to the Fishbowl
Kenny Chesney is synonymous with all things summer and good times. "Welcome to the Fishbowl" is a radical departure. If you're going to drink a beer and listen to this album, you may need a Prozac chaser. It is a bit short on fun as Chesney deals with terminal illnesses, loss of privacy and lost love. It leads off with the catchy Come Over, which is in the same vein as Lady A's Need You Now. On Sing 'Em My Good Friend, a man selling an old guitar full of memories »»»
Hemingway's Whiskey CD review - Hemingway's Whiskey
There are two warring sides to Kenny Chesney's musical personality. There's the part of him that wants to record throwaway, beach bum anthems like Coastal. However, the singer's better half excels at ballads like Where I Grew Up. The latter song contrasts youthful foolish behaviors with events that add quality real world experiences to a life. Drinking beer with high school buddies may have made him feel like a man, but it was a drunk-driving accident that grew him up - but fast. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Newport Folk Fest retains its beauty – With acts ranging from Ray LaMontagne to The Staves to Case/Lang/Veirs, the Newport Folk Festival ran the gamut from tried and true to not so well known to brand new (sort of) acts. And that was the beauty of day one of the festival in enabling attendees to sample a wide range of music and genres, albeit little of it folk as we once knew it.... »»»
Concert Review: Hensley, Ickes have a good thing going – Chances are strong that Dobro master extraordinaire Rob Ickes has used the line a time or two when he explained his instrument of choice as "a guitar played incorrectly." The line got the requisite laughter from the small crowd of about 25 in the intimate club. His sidekick, Trey Hensley, didn't offer any such comment.... »»»
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