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Jager helps Houser tour

Tuesday, March 27, 2012 – Randy Houser will be touring with a little help from Jagermeister. The tour will kick off on April 26th in Knoxville, Tenn. and will hit 16 cities across the nation with Rick Monroe as the supporting act.

Jagermeister has a long history of supporting bands, both from a local level to national amphitheater acts. Houser said, "In 2009 I had the chance to be out on Jagermeister's first country tour with my buddy Pat Green right as I was about to put out my first single, so I couldn't be more excited to be out on this Jagermeister Presents Tour. It's gonna be one hell of a party."

Houser enjoyed chart success with Boots On and Anything Goes. After touring alongside Willie Nelson and Jamey Johnson on the Country Throwdown Tour in the summer of 2011, Houser began recording his first album on Stoney Creek Records. His first radio single from the forthcoming release is slated for spring.

Monroe will be on his fifth tour with Jagermeister. He is releasing his new single, Crazy Not To on Render Records in support of his new EP, his first project for Render.

Tour dates are:

April 26 | Knoxville, TN | Cotton Eyed Joe's

April 27 | Columbia, SC | Tin Roof

April 28 | Duluth (Atlanta), GA | Wild Bill's

May 11 | Baton Rouge, LA | Texas Club

May 24 | Davie, FL | The Roundup

May 25 | Fort Walton Beach, FL | The Block

June 14 | Fort Wayne, IN | Piere's

June 16 | Charlotte, NC | Coyote Joe's

June 21 | Salisbury, MA | Blue Ocean Music Hall

June 22 | Portland, ME | Asylum

June 24 | Keene, NH | Colonial Theatre

June 28 | Winston Salem, NC | Johnny & June Saloon

June 29 | Raleigh, NC | City Limits Saloon

June 30 | Murrells Inlet, SC | The Beaver Bar

July 13 | Evansville, IN | Stoney's July 27 | Chicago, IL | Joe's Sports Bar

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Fired Up CD review - Fired Up
A brand of neo-traditional country music has entered the mainstream scene in response to the hip hop beats of bro country and smooth EDM of metro country. Artists like Aaron Watson and Randy Houser are providing a strong alternative on the charts for fans who prefer their country closer to its roots. The challenge for a country artist today is to find a balance between the fans and their business. A small handful of writers are responsible for most of the mainstream chart toppers, resulting in a »»»
How Country Feels CD review - How Country Feels
Despite a good track record of releasing quality music, Randy Houser hasn't become a consistent chart-topper yet. His new album, "How Country Feels," has already brought him one hit song with the title track, so perhaps a change of scenery (Houser is now on Stoney Creek) was what his career needed. Houser's last album, "They Call Me Cadillac," was a bluesy, varied album that unfortunately yielded no hits. This time around, he's gone for a much simpler »»»
They Call Me Cadillac CD review - They Call Me Cadillac
Country music needs more true country songs, not more songs proving country credentials. Randy Houser's latest contains a few examples of the former. After bragging unnecessarily in one verse about liking to "smoke from my left hand," he ends the chorus to Whistlin' Dixie by stating, "I ain't just Whistlin' Dixie." Then on the bluesy, rocking Out Here In The Country he tells us, "Them city lights ain't my cup of tea." But this bluster all »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Cadillac Three, Sellers do it their own way – The way The Cadillac Three lead singer Jaren Johnston told it, the band could have had their choice of opening tours this year for the likes of Kenny Chesney, Dierks Bentley and Jake Owen. No go though because the long-haired singer fronting the rough-and-most-definitely ready trio said the band wanted to do it their own way. Based on this most... »»»
Concert Review: Great songs, not glitz, highlight Lynn tribute – An eclectic group of Americana artists gathered together for a relatively low-key tribute to Loretta Lynn on the eve of the glitzy Grammy Awards. In contrast to the expensive dresses and song sets displayed at Staples Center for the awards show TV broadcast, these performers were backed by a skillful traditional country music house band.... »»»
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