Kickstart Country Standard Time to Nashville
 Sign up for newsletter
 

Scud Mountain Boys reform 14 years later

Monday, October 17, 2011 – The Scud Mountain Boys, who disbanded in 1997, will play several east coast shows in January and February 2012.

Stephen Desaulniers, Joe Pernice, Tom Shea and Bruce Tull, who comprised the band throughout most of its short recording and touring career from 1991-97, will play together for the first time in 14 years.

Dates are:

Friday, Jan. 13, 2012 - Bowery Ballroom, New York, NY

Saturday Jan. 14 - Brighton Music Hall, Boston, MA

Sunday, Jan. 15 - Pearl Street Clubroom, Northampton, MA

Saturday, Feb. 18, 2012 - Johnny Brenda's, Philadelphia, PA

Sunday, Feb. 19, 2012- The Black Cat, Washington, DC

James Walbourne, who plays in The Pernice Brothers with Joe Pernice, and also plays with The Pretenders, Edwyn Collins and Peter Bruntnell, will open the shows in January.

In August, after being out-of-contact for many years, Pernice, Desaulniers and Shea had an almost-impromptu reunion in Cambridge, Mass., after which they announced the full Scud Mountain Boys line-up would do these shows. Ashmont Records will re-release "The Early Year "in January 2012. "There are plans afoot for other re-releases and recordings, but nothing solid to report at this writing," the Scuds' publicist said Monday.

The Scud Mountain Boys began as the Scuds in western Massachusetts in 1991. Back then the group played loud rock 'n' roll in local clubs. But after those shows ended, the band would retreat to Bruce's kitchen to unwind. There, late at night, they would break out their old country favorites, playing the songs they thought too quiet and too slow for live performances.

The band found that these were the songs they really lived to play, so they decided to make a change. Adding "mountain boys" to their name, the re-christened Scud Mountain Boys played their first show in 1993. In keeping with their simplified approach, the Scud Mountain Boys preferred to record in the same kitchen that spawned their new direction. They had tried recording in a small studio but found it alienating. A 4-track recorder captured the sounds for 12 original songs and 3 covers of songs originally performed by such diverse sources as Jimmy Webb (Wichita Lineman), Olivia Newton-John (Please, Mister Please), and Cher (Gypsies, Tramps and Thieves). Originally sold as the Pine Box cassette, the tracks were later released on vinyl by the indie-rock label Chunk Records in 1995.

Later in 1995 the Scud Mountain Boys recorded another set of tracks which became "Dance the Night Away" on Chunk. Including more 4-track kitchen recordings, as well as others made a 24-track studio, the CD-only release featured drums on a few songs, another Jimmy Webb cover (Where's the Playground Susie).

The band signed with Seattle's Sub Pop Records and recorded "Massachusetts," a14-song album with a number of more upbeat songs with drums and electric guitar. Released in 1996, the CD received much praise. Sub Pop released the first 2 CDs as "The Early Year," a double CD, in 1997. The group disbanded shortly after that release, and has not performed since.

Tickets for these shows go on sale Oct. 21.

More news for Scud Mountain Boys

CD reviews for Scud Mountain Boys

The Early Year
The Scud Mountain Boys rose out of late night gatherings in guitarist/vocalist Bruce Tull's kitchen, playing quiet, acoustic, country-flavored tunes more than the regular rock bands they were used to playing in. The Scuds became a full-time project and, almost immediately, released two records in one year. This is a double-CD reissue of these first two releases: "Pine Box" and "Dance The Night Away" (both released in 1995 on Chunk Records). The former was recorded with just one microphone. »»»
Massachusetts
On the Scuds' latest, they reveal where there true musical direction lies. Although definitely having some country influences, the sound is similar to that of Better than Ezra or R.E.M. in their mellower moments. They also display their country influences, evoking memories of Gram Parsons, the Jayhawks et al on tracks prominently featuring traditional country instruments such as the mandolin, lap steel, and pedal steel guitar ("Big Hole" and "Van Drunk"). The tempo is rather slow and laid-back throughout. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: With Staples, Newport Folk Festival overcomes – The sun finally broke through, appropriately enough, on what had been an off-and-on rainy day at the third and final day of the Newport Folk Festival towards the end of long day with Mavis Staples headlining. And while there were a few dour-type performances (Conor Oberst most prominently), the joy and palpable energy exuded by Staples, the scion of... »»»
Concert Review: With Aldean, lightng (and volume) strike – With Kenny on the bench this year, cities have doubled down on a heavy dose of the bro country movement. Luke Bryan is playing the football stadiums while Jason Aldean takes on the ball parks. On a rain drenched Saturday night, Aldean set up shop in center field in Pittsburgh's PNC Park. Still touring behind last year's number one... »»»
Subscribe to Country News Digest Country News Digest      Follow Country Standard Time on twitter CST      Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook CST

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Kickstart Country Standard Time to Nashville
Trampled by Turtles get wild Trampled By Turtles is an indie folk group, an alt.-country band or a bluegrass act - depending on how you choose to look at them. Perhaps it's best to view the outfit as the ultimate combo platter consisting of just about everything that's good about American music. They play wonderfully, yet they also write intelligent songs that draw everyone from Townes Van Zandt to Nirvana to Ralph Stanley. It's all good, and some (or all) of these influences can be spotted in most of Trampled By Turtles' enjoyable sounds.... »»»
Don't try labeling Parker Millsap If you move in alt.-country/Americana circles, you simply cannot get away from the name Parker Millsap. He's certainly one of the biggest buzz artists of 2014. Better still, his self-titled album lives up to all the hype. He's a smart songwriter and a passionate singer and is essential listening for anybody looking for high quality contemporary music. Millsap also creates music appealing to a wide variety of musical tastes. You can make a case that he's a country guy, but you can also hear a lot of blues and folk. And if you attempt to put a label on him, he'll quickly tear it right off.... »»»
Simpson gets metamodern What a difference a year can make. Last year, Sturgill Simpson was overly anxious about the arrival of his debut album, "High Top Mountain." This year, Simpson is simultaneously anticipating the birth of his debut child and his just-released sophomore album, "Metamodern Sounds in Country Music," and his mood couldn't be more relaxed and joyous.... »»»
Do You Know Me: A Tribute to George Jones CD review - Do You Know Me: A Tribute to George Jones
Every male country singer worth his salt has been influenced by George Jones who died in April 2013; if not vocally, at the very least because of respect for country traditions and love of a fine song. Few, however, have the skills to sing as much like Jones as Sammy Kershaw can. If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, Kershaw has that whole sincerity thing down pat. »»»
Wild Animals CD review - Wild Animals
Trampled By Turtles, the five-piece band from Duluth, Minn., combines bluegrass, folk and country into an enjoyable mixture. This act, which has been known to cover such unexpected artists as the extremely somber Radiohead in concert, is gradually moving away from its speedy bluegrass leanings and incorporating much more moody instrumental blends into its music. "Wild Animals'" title track, for instance, opens up this 11-song album with a slow, dirge-y piece. »»»
Bridges CD review - Bridges
Every artist has that dream duet they'd love to perform. They're fans too and long to share the stage with the very artists who helped to inspire their dreams and while it happens for some, it's surely not enough. And with that being the case, newcomer Mary Sarah needs to count her blessings as her debut record, "Bridges," finds the artist trading duets with a virtual "who's who" of country music greats. »»»
I'm A Song CD review - I'm A Song
In promoting "I'm a Song," Jim Lauderdale put out a satirical video with his band in which he dons a trucker's cap and celebrates the creation of "bro-grass." The good-natured video served to show how Lauderdale doesn't fit in with what's most popular in Nashville these days, but listen to his latest - a wonderful, 20-song album - and you know the in-demand songwriter certainly can't be that unpopular.  »»»