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Chely Wright signs with Vanguard, new CD coming

Wednesday, February 10, 2010 – Chely Wright signed with Vanguard Records and will release her new CD, "Lifted Off The Ground," on May 4. Produced by Rodney Crowell, Wright wrote 11 songs for the project, including 1 co-write with Crowell.

At the same time Wright will also be releasing her first book, "Like Me" (Random House). The book is said to be a "candid account of her life, her career and her extraordinary journey. Like Me is a book of revelation: honest, inspiring and true," according to her publicist.

Wright, 39, scored with hits Single White Female and Shut Up and Drive. The Missouri native's most recent release of original material, "The Metropolitan Hotel," was on Dualtone in 2005.

Wright received the Academy of Country Music's Award for Best New Female Artist in 1995.

More news for Chely Wright

CD reviews for Chely Wright

Lifted Off the Ground CD review - Lifted Off the Ground
It would be almost impossible to give a review of the newest release from Chely Wright without also mentioning the other reason she's been in the news lately. Wright's recent admission that she is a lesbian has mostly overshadowed her new album, but the record should not be ignored. Many of the songs were born out of the depression that had taken over Wright's life under the weight of the secret she was keeping. Writing them helped to pull her out. As you might expect, this is a »»»
The Metropolitan Hotel CD review - The Metropolitan Hotel
After giving up on the major labels and maybe vice versa and an ill-fated stint with a new indie that produced one measly single, Chely Wright went her own way to very good effect. The Kansan always has had a strong voice that does justice to the material. That has not changed one iota here, although she can sound tender (the opener "It's the Song" about the difficult life on the road), but is no easy mark. What may be different this time around is Wright is tackling far weightier matters. »»»
Never Love You Enough
The new-traditionalist tag hung on Chely Wright's early career, and intimate album tracks like "Emma Jean's Guitar," were all but banished with the success of 1999's "Single White Female." Folksiness has given way to the chart-friendly crossover material and arena-styled power-ballads that continue to reign on her latest. The leadoff track, "Never Love You Enough" resounds with second-generation Beatle influences by way of Badfinger and Klaatu, and "For the Long Run" sports a melodic hook »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Fogerty lives up to his past – Once upon a time, John Fogerty eschewed any association with the band that made him famous, Creedence Clearwater Revival. But time, which changed a long time ago, heals everything apparently. Not only is Fogerty playing CCR songs, he makes those overwhelmingly the cornerstone of his very fine, invigorating night of music that were the soundtracks of... »»»
Concert Review: With Turnpike Troubadors, there's lots of good reason – The appearance of Turnpike Troubadours was a bit curious. The Oklahoma Red Dirt music troupe has not released an album since 2012's "Goodbye Normal Street." So, it's not as if they're pushing new product. They also had never even played Boston before. In fact, lead singer Evan Felker said he had never set foot in Beantown period.... »»»
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