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Mary Chapin Carpenter looks for Miracles in April

Wednesday, January 13, 2010 – Mary Chapin Carpenter will be back with "The Age of Miracles" on April 27 on Zoe/Rounder Records. This will be Carpenter's first CD since "Come Darkness, Come Night," a holiday disc she did in 2008 where she wrote all the songs. Her last regular studio CD was 2007's "The Calling."

Recorded in Nashville, the 12-track album was produced by Carpenter and long-time collaborator Matt Rollings (Lyle Lovett, Keith Urban) and was recorded and mixed by Chuck Ainlay (Mark Knopfler, Sheryl Crow, Willie Nelson). Carpenter was backed by a band that includes Rollings (piano, B-3 organ), Russ Kunkel (drums), Duke Levine (electric and acoustic guitar), Glenn Worf (bass), Dan Dugmore (steel and 12 string guitar) and Eric Darken (percussion). The album also features guest vocals by Vince Gill on I Put My Ring Back On and Alison Krauss on I Was a Bird.

A national tour is planned surrounding the release.

More news for Mary Chapin Carpenter

CD reviews for Mary Chapin Carpenter

Songs From the Movie CD review - Songs From the Movie
Mary Chapin Carpenter revisits 10 songs - not her greatest hits by any stretch - from her two-decade plus career with a twist. No guitars or anything else resembling her typical instrumentation (jazz drummer Peter Erskine contributes). Instead, Carpenter is often only backed by an orchestra on what is being billed as her debut orchestral record. Carpenter recorded the disc at London's AIR Studios with a 63-piece orchestra and 15-voice choir, the latter being under the radar screen throughout. »»»
The Age of Miracles CD review - The Age of Miracles
Like Emmylou Harris, Rosanne Cash and few others, Mary Chapin Carpenter has continued to create music of substance long after the hit-making machine lost the wherewithal to appreciate her talents. Some have identified Carpenter's music having been too sedate since the turn of the century, lacking the appealing hooks and lively choruses of her commercial zenith. While not entirely inaccurate, Carpenter has never released an album without more positives than negatives. This streak continues »»»
Come Darkness, Come Light Twelve Sngs of Christmas CD review - Come Darkness, Come Light Twelve Sngs of Christmas
Try this one at home: Gather a group of friends around the stereo, put Mary Chapin Carpenter's new CD on, and let it play about half way through. Then take a poll, asking what kind of a CD everybody was listening to. And unless your dinner party was listening to the lyrics closely, they wouldn't have a clue that it's a Christmas CD. First off, few of these songs are familiar ones; certainly not the ones you hear in a million different variations at the mall. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Avett Brothers come home – For the 30th anniversary of the "Traditional Plus" MerleFest music festival, there might not be a more appropriate act to anchor the opening night than the Avett Brothers. Born of a desire to bring rock 'n' roll energy to traditional music and formed by devotees to Doc Watson, The Avetts may have outgrown their acoustic roots over... »»»
Concert Review: Turnpike Troubadours leave no doubt – Turnpike Troubadours have not released an album since mid-September 2015. Don't look for any new release hitting the streets any day now either. The last time the Oklahoma-based band played Boston, they were in a pretty, 1,200-seat theatre. So, one could have been outwardly skeptical about the band when it downsized to a venue on the outskirts... »»»
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Trace Adkins' wonderful low singing voice can be a little deceptive because he could easily sing utter crap and still somehow sound great. It's why the critical ear must pay close attention to specifically what he's saying in his songs whenever evaluating his work. Adkins doesn't write his own songs, so he's entirely dependent upon stellar writers.  »»»