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CMAs boost sales

Wednesday, November 18, 2009 – The Country Music Association Awards show of last week proved yet again to be a harbinger of great record sales.

Zac Brown Band's "Live From Bonnaroo," which contains the group's cover of The Devil Went Down To Georgia, skyrocketed 379 percent to about 900 units.

Darius Rucker saw sales of his "Learn to Live" debut CD jump 83 percent to 23,354. Keith Urban's "Defying Gravity" shot up 43 percent to 11,049.

Other benficiairies of the CMAs were:

Jamey Johnson That Lonesome Song (286 percent to about 15,000 units)

Sugarland Love On The Inside (136 percent, about 14,000)

Sugarland Live On The Inside CD/DVD (110 percent, about 6,000)

Brad Paisley American Saturday Night (94 percent, about 10,000)

Darius Rucker Learn To Live (83 percent, 23,354)

Zac Brown Band The Foundation (55 percent, about 36,000)

Keith Urban Defying Gravity (43 percent, 11,049)

Taylor Swift Taylor Swift (40 percent, about 16,000)

Billy Currington Little Bit Of Everything (42 percent, about 6,000)

George Strait Twang (32 percent, about 10,000)

Taylor Swift Fearless (30 percent, about 91,000)

CMAs Vocal Group of the Year Lady Antebellum enjoyed their biggest sales week ever - even after 83 weeks on the Billboard country albums chart. The group sold 45,228 albums this week (a 130-percent increase from last week) beating their self-titled platinum selling debut album street week number of 43,384 albums sold.

After the group's CMA Awards performance of Need You Now, their hit and title track of their forthcoming album, the single shot straight to the top of the all-genre digital charts at iTunes and Amazon Mp3 and is Verizon's number one selling country ringback and ringtone (number 3 ringtone and number 2 ringback overall).

The RIAA certified their debut single Love Don't Live Here and their current single gold this week. The song also is number one of both the Billboard and Mediabase/Country Aircheck charts and is spending its sixth consecutive week at numero uno on the Billboard Canada chart.

Lady Antebellum releases "Need You Now" on Jan. 26, 2010. They will finish up a few remaining tour dates through the end of the year and then join Tim McGraw on his Southern Voice tour at the beginning of next year.

More news for Lady Antebellum

CD reviews for Lady Antebellum

Golden CD review - Golden
Lady Antebellum probably needed a change in direction after "Own the Night" dropped in 2011. The material was overly geared towards taking dead aim at the radio jugular and not the best material. That isn't the case this time out on the trio's fifth release because most of the songs veer away from being obviously radio fodder (except for the current singleDowntown with its soulful beginning and strong vocals from Hillary Scott), but that also doesn't man that this was the right change. »»»
On This Winter's Night CD review - On This Winter's Night
With a Lady Antebellum Christmas CD, as with any Lady A music, you know you're going to get some quality, if unspectacular recordings. Therefore, "On This Winter's Night" presents just what you'd expect from this trio, although six of the songs were out two years ago on the EP "A Merry Little Christmas." The best cut on the CD is a cover of Donny Hathaway's This Christmas, which brings out a soulful side you never knew Lady Antebellum had. »»»
Own the Night CD review - Own the Night
Lady Antebellum needn't worry about being third time lucky because they jumped out of the box and onto the charts from the get go. And they went off the charts so to speak with I Need You Now from their sophomore effort, but that very uneven disc contained a slew of mediocre songs and hits. The good news about "Own the NIght" is that the material is a whole lot better. There are plenty of strong songs here with a lot of the songs sounding very radio ready. The strength of the trio »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: No wonder life is good for Shovels & Rope – Things are go swimmingly - pun intended - for Shovels & Rope, the South Carolina-based duo comprised of husband-and-wife Cary Ann Hearst and Michael Trent. For starters, their new disc, "Swimmin' Time," debuted at 21 on the Billboard Top 200 in its first week just a few shot weeks ago. On the local front, the band was playing two... »»»
Concert Review: Americana fest moves beyond borders – It's the final night of the 2014 Americana Festival and Conference, and the final event of a spectacular five-day run. Lucinda Williams is about to begin a last minute invitation-only performance at the newly opened City Winery in Nashville, but first, Americana Music Association Executive Director Jed Hilly walks to the microphone.... »»»
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