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"Mountain Soul II" coming from Patty Loveless

Wednesday, July 8, 2009 – Appalachian music worked the first time around for Patty Loveless, so she's going to do it again. "Mountain Soul II" comes out Sept. 29 on Saguaro Road.

"It's Appalachian, bluegrass and country combined," said Loveless. "You should never try to duplicate something like 'Mountain Soul.' What you should do is enhance. So this is like a continuation."

The first "Mountain Soul" CD was issued June 2001 and as a result of fan response, Loveless was invited to perform on the "Down From the Mountain" tour. She says that experience introduced her to a whole new audience.

"I was blessed to be able to expose my music to people who normally don't listen to country music. They loved the more organic, rootsy thing, but they don't listen to mainstream country. I met quite a few people who told me that. They kept wanting me to try and recapture that sound. They'd say, 'When are you

Loveless' husband and producer Emory Gordy Jr. recruited fiddler Deanie Richardson, Dobro player Rob Ickes, singer Jon Randall and harmony vocalists Rebecca Lynn Howard, all of whom had backed Loveless on the original "Mountain Soul."

Bluegrass greats Del and Ronnie McCoury participated, as did Vince Gill, Carl Jackson, Bryan Sutton, Mike Auldridge, Emmylou Harris, steel guitarist Al Perkins, Loveless' 16-year-old vocal discovery Sydni Perry and several other visitors to the Music Row recording sessions.

"We just had such a great time," said Loveless. "It was like we were singing and playing for each other. We wanted to try and make it live, as much as possible. There were no drums, so everybody gravitated towards each other's inner rhythms. We started the sessions on a Monday, and we finished that Thursday evening. I had so much fun making this record that I didn't want it to end."

Songs range from the traditional gospel tunes Working on a Building and Friends in Gloryland to contemporary compositions such as Randall's ballad You Burned the Bridge and Barbara Keith's folk ode Bramble and the Rose. The daughter of a Kentucky coal miner, Loveless restores the original mining lyrics to Harlan Howard's 1962 classic Busted. On the Emmylou Harris song Diamond in My Crown, Loveless' vocal is accompanied by a harmony part from its originator. Gordy's co-written When the Last Curtain Falls is a honky-tonker. The lovely melody of Fools Thin Air, penned by Susanna Clark and Rodney Crowell, is filled with bluegrass harmony. Prisoner's Tears is backed by sighing steel guitar.

Loveless took a rare turn at writing, penning We Are All) Children of Abraham with Gordy as her collaborator. The team also co-wrote Big Chance.

"It all just came together," Loveless said. "It was like we were in my living room performing. I loved being around those folks. Having all of those people in there, you felt like you were at a really special get-together."

"Mountain Soul II " is the follow-up to "Sleepless Nights," Loveless' Grammy Award nominated debut album for Saguaro Road.

More news for Patty Loveless

CD reviews for Patty Loveless

Mountain Soul II CD review - Mountain Soul II
Patty Loveless' first venture into bluegrass, "Mountain Soul," along with a performance slot on the popular Down From the Mountain tour in 2001, helped Loveless to find a spotlight of her own in bluegrass. Eight years later, Loveless lends her still supple voice to a blend of bluegrass songs, traditional gospel tunes and even several self-penned songs, with solid, if not superb, results. Loveless' voice occasionally shows signs of age here, but that very element brings a »»»
Sleepless Nights CD review - Sleepless Nights
Quite simply, Patty Loveless is one of the finest traditional country singers in the past 15 years, and this covers collection that sometimes goes way back in time on a new label does nothing to dispel that fact one iota. She may be in middle age - and perhaps considered "old" by modern radio standards - but no need to worry about quality. The voice still reigns supreme. She wrings the lyrics for much emotion without overdoing it ("why did you go/don't you know I need »»»
Dreamin' My Dreams CD review - Dreamin' My Dreams
Patty Loveless hit her peak popularity well over a decade ago now, with hits like "Timber, I'm Falling in Love" and "I Try to Think About Elvis." But in recent years, she's quietly recorded some of her best music, turning to bluegrass on "Mountain Soul" and now returning to more standard country fare. Loveless' success has been based on two factors. First is incredible song selection - Loveless and her husband/producer Emory Gordy Jr. have a knack for finding songs that express the joy and pain »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: On day 3, MerleFest opts for tradition – The biggest day of the MerleFest weekend is always Saturday. There was still plenty of "Plus" to go around, but the highlights of this year's big day focused on the more traditional side of the festival's "Traditional Plus" lineup from headliners Dave Rawlings Machine down to the regional acts on the smaller stages.... »»»
Concert Review: MerleFest showcases diversity on day two – Although primarily thought of as a "roots music" festival, the artists at MerleFest can and do come from a variety of genres and locales. On the first full day of this year's festival, that point was underscored with performances from not just bluegrass and string bands, but also rock 'n' roll, soul and international acts... »»»
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