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Vern Gosdin dies at 74

Wednesday, April 29, 2009 – Singer Vern Gosdin, 74, who was on the country charts from the mid-1970s until the early 1990s and considered one of the best honky tonk singers of his time, died at midnight after suffering a stroke about three weeks ago.

Tammy Wynette once said of Gosdin, who was known as The Voice, that he was "the only other singer who can hold a candle to George Jones."

Gosdin had number 1 hits with I Can Tell By the Way You Dance (You're Gonna Love Me Tonight) in 1983, Set 'Em Up Joe in 1988 and I'm Still Crazy in 1989.

Gosdin was born on Aug 5, 1934 in Woodland, Ala. He learned how to play mandolin while growing up. In the early 1950s, he was part of the Gosdin Family radio show from Birmingham, Ala. By 1960, he moved to California and formed the Golden State Boys with brother Rex. The group was named the Hillmen after mandolinist Chris Hillman, who was in the band and later co-founded the Flying Burrito Brothers and the Desert Rose Band. The brothers later recorded together as The Gosdin Brothers, having a top 40 song, Hangin' On in 1967. They also played on the first solo album with Gene Clark in 1967 after he left The Byrds, "Gene Clark with the Gosdin Brothers."

The Gosdin brothers quit by 1972 and worked day jobs in Atlanta.

Vern Gosdin gave it another shot and convinced friend Emmylou Harris to head to Nashville for a demo session. Gosdin soon signed with Elektra. He first charted in his solo career in 1976 with Hangin' On, which would go on to be the first of 41 songs to hit the Billboard charts. Gosdin enjoyed a hit, Till the End, with then unknown Janie Frickie. He shifted labels, going to Ovation, AMI and Compleat. After Compleat went bankrupt, Gosdin signed with Columbia in 1987. He won the Country Music Association song of the year in 1989 for Chiseled in Stone, a co-write with frequent partner Max D. Barnes.

CD reviews for Vern Gosdin

The Voice
Vern Gosdin has had an awful lot of hits (19 in the Top Ten alone) for someone whose name recognition is probably very low. He has never been anything other than 100-percent pure country, which means his chances of having more hits aren't as good as they ought to be. His phrasing and type of material have pretty much kept Gosdin in George Jones' big shadow, which isn't such a bad place to be. In the past, Gosdin could at times have been mistaken for Jones, but his voice isnot as deep here. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Puss n Boots has a lot to live up to – Six years after first playing together, life is seems to be very good these days for Puss n Boots. The trio - Norah Jones, Sasha Dobson and Catherine Popper - just released their first album, a collection of originals and mainly country covers. And they're about to play the ultra prestigious Newport Folk Festival this weekend.... »»»
Concert Review: Fogerty lives up to his past – Once upon a time, John Fogerty eschewed any association with the band that made him famous, Creedence Clearwater Revival. But time, which changed a long time ago, heals everything apparently. Not only is Fogerty playing CCR songs, he makes those overwhelmingly the cornerstone of his very fine, invigorating night of music that were the soundtracks of... »»»
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