Sign up for newsletter
 

Mead blankets Music City with CD release shows

Friday, May 17, 2019 – Former BR549 mainstay Chuck Mead is going back to playing for tips.

But only for the record release festivities in Nashville.

Mead, who releases "Close to Home" on June 21, plans to do six shows around Music City between June 18 and 23 including Robert's Western World, where BR549 used to play for tips and recorded a live disc there.

"I thought instead of trying to choose where to do my record release party," he said, "I'd play more than one my favorite venues in town. It just so happens that because I luckily live in Nashville with so many great honky-tonks around, that I could do five days' worth. Come down to one, come down to all of them and hear the new record. And still, don't let the tip jar hit you in the ass on the way out."

Honky-Tonk tour dates are:
June 18 American Legion Hall Honky-Tonk Tuesday, 9 p.m.
June 19 The 5 Spot, 6 p.m.
June 20 Dee's Country Cocktail Lounge, 7 p.m.
June 21 The Nashville Palace, 6 p.m.
June 22 Grand Ole Opry, 7 p.m.
June 22 Robert's Western World, 10 p.m.
June 23 Grimey's, 1 p.m.

Over the course of the late '90s and early 2000s, BR5-49 (and later BR549) recorded seven albums and spread the gospel of neo-traditional country music around the world, garnering the band a CMA Award for Best International Touring Act and three Grammy nominations.

Mead's whirlwind tour of Nashville is in support of an album that he actually made in Memphis. The 11-track disc is a Memphis-spiced hardcore country set recorded at Sam Phillips Recording Studios and was produced by Memphis recording engineer/producer Matt Ross-Spang. Out on Nashville independent label Plowboy Records, it is the follow-up to Mead's first Plowboy release, 2015's "Free State Serenade," and his fourth solo album overall.

"It's probably the least-country record I've ever made," Mead admits, "but at the same time, it's really a country record."

Mead, who serves as the Musical Director/Supervisor/Producer of the hit Broadway musical "Million Dollar Quartet," filled similar roles on the companion CMT dramatic series, "Sun Records." The time he spent in Memphis during the production of the TV series led to Mead's change of recording venue for his new album.

"I really delved into the Memphis music scene when I was living there for four months," he said. "I wanted to get as many local Memphis musicians to play in the series as possible. I got to know a lot of people in the scene, and I'd known producer Matt Ross-Spang for quite a while. When the 'Million Dollar Quartet' show was on tour, we came through Memphis a couple of times. At night, the cast would record at the original Memphis Recording Service (better known as Sun Studios) and that's where I first met Matt. He was very young, but was the head engineer and really brought the old studio back into shape. I started hanging out with him, and he kept talking to me about cutting a record in Memphis." By the time Mead was ready to record, Ross-Spang moved from Sun to Sam Phillips Recording, the Memphis studio built by Sun Records head Phillips in 1960. Ross-Spang has worked with John Prine, Jason Isbell and Margo Price. He engineered Prine's The Tree of Forgiveness; co-produced Price's debut, "Midwest Farmer's Daughter" and sophomore effort "All American Made"and notched the Grammy for engineering Isbell's "The Nashville Sound" (as he did for 2015's "Something More Than Free").

"I've recorded in some cool Nashville studios like the Quonset Hut, RCA Studio B and the Castle," Mead said. "But there was something almost supernatural about working at Phillips. You could feel Sam's spirit."

"Matt wanted me to make a bigger record," Mead said, "something that was out of my box and I was all for it. So I turned it over to him, and he took things in a direction I didn't foresee."

"I really wanted to make a record that was a little bit different from what I had been doing," Mead says. "Looking back, I really have done that on every record I've made, because why make the same record every time?"

More news for Chuck Mead

CD reviews for Chuck Mead

Close to Home CD review - Close to Home
Honky tonker Chuck Mead, former leader of the neo-traditionalists BR-549, steps out once again for his fourth solo effort, this one recorded in Memphis under acclaimed and current "go-to" roots producer/engineer Matt Ross-Spang. "Close to Home" was recorded at the historic Sam Phillips Recording Studios and marries country with vintage rock n' roll. Of course, Mead's been doing that for the better part of 25 years, but this one has that Sun Records Memphis flavor, »»»
Free State Serenade CD review - Free State Serenade
Chuck Mead, best known for his successful start with BR549, takes us back to his home state of Kansas for a vivid look at what formed his mind and imagination as he grew up here. "Free State Serenade" opens the eyes of the listener to a wild eventful ride of good, bad, mixed in with some sad and downright crazy. Mead rips through 12 songs here, mixing up his rockabilly, "A Short Goodbye" telling the story about leaving home to head out on his own, the western swing of »»»
Back at the Quonset Hut CD review - Back at the Quonset Hut
Former BR549 member Chuck Mead's latest collection of country classics was recorded at the Quonset Hut, the legendary Nashville studio founded by Owen Bradley. Mead is at his best on up-tempo tracks such as Johnny Horton's Honky Tonk Hardwood Floor , Del Reeves' Girl On The Billboard and Hank Williams' Settin' The Woods On Fire. Mead's rockabilly influence is on display with nicely done covers of Carl Perkins' Cat Clothes and Gene Vincent's Be Bop A Lula. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Stapleton shows his traditional roots – Chris Stapleton's All-American Road show feels like a singular mission to rid the genre of the bro country scourge that has plagued it for years. He came out with a blazing one-two punch of "Second One To Know" and "Without Your Love" and packed a stadium sized onslaught into a 9,000-seat arena. He never once veered from his... »»»
Concert Review: Jinks wins over fans, especially new ones – Cody Jinks asked the crowd a bit into his show how many had never seen him before. It seemed like Jinks has made a lot of musical inroads into the public's consciousness because roughly three quarters of the audience raised their hands to show that this was their first time. That probably made Jinks feel pretty darn good about how life has been... »»»
Follow Country Standard Time  Subscribe to Country News Digest  Follow Country Standard Time on twitter  Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook 

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Chip Kinman celebrates brother, career on "Sounds Like Music" For a brief moment last summer, the news of Tony Kinman's death was, if not greatly exaggerated, then at least fortuitously premature. The roots rock icon, known for his work in The Dils, Rank and File, Blackbird and Cowboy Nation with his younger brother Chip, had been diagnosed with cancer in March 2018,... »»»
Shiflett learns "Hard Lessons" Until recently, Chris Shiflett took a somewhat obsessive/compulsive approach to his music career. For the past two decades, Shiflett has been the primary guitar foil for Dave Grohl in Foo Fighters; early in his tenure, Shiflett was so self-deprecatingly... »»»
White embraces "The Hurting Kind" John Paul White, to paraphrase a Steve Earle song, may just be one of the last of the hardcore troubadours. By 'troubadour,' we mean one of those guys that lives to write great songs - more specifically, great country songs - and then get these songs into the ears of folks that... »»»
Bingham gets personal with "American Love Song"...again A lot of the early reviews for "American Love Song," Ryan Bingham's latest set of raucous and reflective Americana brilliance, have characterized it as the singer/ songwriter's most personal album to date.... »»»
Wilson goes her own way After having huge success at the get go with "Redneck Woman," Wilson eventually went her own way and took a break. During her "hiatus," Wilson started her own label and was a "120 percent mom" to her teenage daughter.... »»»
While I'm Livin' CD review - While I'm Livin'
It's been 17 years since we've had a new album from Tanya Tucker, so it's a real pleasure to hear her clear throaty vocals deliver these songs with her characteristic raw emotion. Tucker knows how to get into a song and make it her own »»»
New Moon Over My Shoulder CD review - New Moon Over My Shoulder
Larry Sparks was still a teenager when Ralph Stanley chose him to replace his brother Carter Stanley as guitarist and lead singer in the Clinch Mountain Boys in the wake of Carter's passing in December 1966. »»»
Chronicle: Friends and Music CD review - Chronicle: Friends and Music
The third solo album from a member of Sister Sadie to be released in 2019, "Chronicle: Friends and Music" (following those of Deanie Richardson and Dale Ann Bradley) reflects the breadth of modern bluegrass: energetic and intense, »»»
Blue Roses CD review - Blue Roses

Runaway June - Naomi Cooke, Hannah Mulholland and Jennifer Wayne - weave gorgeous harmonies around the lyrics of these songs on their new album, all but four of which they wrote with other writers. »»»

From Another World CD review - From Another World
Following the passing of the late, great James Brown, there are those that have argued that Jim Lauderdale rightfully deserves to inherit the title of the hardest working man in show business. And for good reason. »»»
Breakdown on 20th Ave. South CD review - Breakdown on 20th Ave. South
"Breakdown on 20th Ave. South is significant in a number of ways. For starters, it marks Julie Miller's return to making music after an absence of 10 years. For another, it finds her collaborating once again with her ever prolific  »»»