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Prine plans new album, tour

Monday, December 4, 2017 – John Prine will release his first album of new material in 13 years next year, he announced today.

Prine, 71, also plans a series of shows. He will co-headline a show at New York's Radio City Music Hall on April 13 with Sturgill Simpson (solo) as well as dates at Philadelphia's Merriam Theatre on April 14, Chicago's Chicago Theatre on April 27, San Francisco'sWarfield on May 24.

Tickets will be available for pre-sale beginning Wednesday, Dec. 6 with general on-sale starting Friday, Dec. 8.

Every ticket sold for these upcoming shows will include a copy of Prine's forthcoming record. No details were released about the album. Prine release a duets album of classics, "For Better, Or Worse," in 2016.

Prine won the Americana Music Honors & Awards' "Artist of the Year" award and released the book "John Prine Beyond Words." Released on his own independent label, Oh Boy Records, the songbook included a selection of favorites songs, photographs and stories from Prine's beloved catalogue.

Tour dates are:
April 13-New York, NY-Radio City Music Hall *
April 14-Philadelphia, PA-Merriam Theatre &
April 25-Milwaukee, WI-Riverside Theatre
April 27-Chicago, IL-Chicago Theatre
April 28-Champaign, IL-Virginia Theatre
May 11-Beaver Dam, KY-Beaver Dam Amphitheater (tickets excluded from album bundle)
May 12-Indianapolis, IN-Clowes Hall
May 19-San Diego, CA-Balboa Theatre
May 23-Folsom, CA-Harris Center
May 24-San Francisco, CA-The Warfield
June 2-Norfolk, VA-Chrysler Hall **
*co-headline with Sturgill Simpson (solo)
& with very special guest Kurt Vile
** with very special guest Margo Price

More news for John Prine

CD reviews for John Prine

For Better, Or Worse CD review - For Better, Or Worse
With "For Better or Worse," John Prine follows up his "In Spite of Ourselves" album with more male/female duets. And this one is a true A-list effort, as it finds Prine trading lines with the likes of Miranda Lambert, Kacey Musgraves and Alison Krauss. Once again, though, Iris DeMent steals the show with the angry and sarcastic "Who's Gonna Take the Garbage Out," the same way she did with the prior album's title cut. She's a worthy sparring partner, »»»
In Person & On Stage CD review - In Person & On Stage
John Prine holds a well-deserved spot in the songwriters' pantheon. So, it's always a bit disappointing when a new Prine release isn't stocked with new Prine songs. After producing 7 albums between 1971-1980, he has only made a handful of albums of originals since then, although he has done a couple covers projects, the "Souvenirs" re-recordings album, a Christmas disc and now his third live album. That said, there are bountiful joys in listening to Prine performing »»»
Fair and Square CD review - Fair and Square
John Prine's first album of new original songs in nine years has a mostly folk sound, full of acoustic guitars with the occasional accordion and harmonica thrown in. "Morning Train" is a sultry song with an organ, low steel guitar, and fantastic background vocals from Mindy Smith. Overall, the songs are good, but not great - many of the lyrics are mundane, although there are some creative highlights. "She Is My Everything," a sweet love featuring the line, "If I get lost you can always find her »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Cantrell continues to satisfy – Laura Cantrell may never be a country star. Not at this stage of her career when she's 50, touring here and there and releasing new music every few years or so. But five albums in, Cantrell continues as a warm, enjoyable and worthy purveyor of her brand of country. That would mean going towards a more traditional side, not rushing the songs... »»»
Concert Review: Not only is Turner traditional, he's popular – Every time Josh Turner reached for some of those wonderful subterranean low notes, which he often pulled out during his enjoyable night show, it was like a superhero applying a superpower. He didn't need this extra advantage to please his audience; he has so many quality songs stockpiled in his catalogue already doing the job.... »»»
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