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John Michael Montgomery's attorney speaks out

Thursday, February 16, 2006 – John Michael Montgomery's attorney said in a statement released Thursday night that he hoped several charges brought against the singer following his arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol early Thursday morning would be dropped.

When stopped by Kentucky police on his way home from a club where he used to perform, he was stopped by police after erratic driving according to a news report. He was charged with possession of a controlled drug, having a prescription drug not in its proper container, carrying a concealed deadly weapon, disregarding a traffic control device and improper turning.

Two weapons were found under his car seat.

Montgomery was held for about four hours, according to a news report.

Attorney John Woodall said in a statement, ""John Michael is not yet able to comment in detail regarding the impaired driver allegations. His attorneys are awaiting completion of a final report to be issued by the arresting officer. Based upon the contents of that report and other evidence a decision will be made concerning the substantive nature of these charges."

"John Michael is of course an avid sportsman and hunter. He has been authorized by the Commonwealth of Kentucky to carry concealed weapons. Unfortunately, John Michael did not have his concealed carry permit with him at the time he was stopped. Once John Michael's permit is produced for law enforcement officials he is hopeful that these charges will be dismissed."

"Approximately one and a half months ago, John Michael underwent extensive hip replacement surgery. In order to treat pain associated with that surgery and his recovery John Michael's physicians have prescribed certain pain medications. The controlled substance charges relate specifically to this prescription medication. Therefore, John Michael is hopeful that the controlled substance charges will also be dismissed."

"John Michael wishes to thank his family, friends, and fans for their support as this matter is resolved."

More news for John Michael Montgomery

CD reviews for John Michael Montgomery

Time Flies CD review - Time Flies
Since his debut in 1992, John Michael Montgomery built a solid career on a foundation of power ballads and uptempo humorous songs. Forming his own label could have offered an opportunity to break that mold. Instead, this is, for the most part, the same album he's put out in the past. There are the requisite good ol' boy humor songs, none with the charm of Sold (The Grundy Country Auction Incident). There's also a string of indistinguishable ballads that don't approach the bar »»»
Mr. Snowman
A decade after his debut hit, "Life's a Dance," John Michael Montgomery releases his first Christmas album, which is also his first co-producing effort. The 10-song disc contains 7 holiday classics and 3 new tunes. Montgomery does well with "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer," and the instrumental solos, from guitar to fiddle to steel guitar, are solid. On the other hand, Montgomery's voice and phrasing aren't a good fit for the big-band arrangement of "Winter Wonderland." He sounds like he's »»»
The Very Best of John Michael Montgomery
John Michael Montgomery was a product of the hat act scene of the '90s. The line dancing craze where a number of telegenic singers put out albums and maybe had a hit was in full swing. But most of them did not last (remember David Kerr?) given their lack of talent in flavor-of-the-month times. Montgomery managed to forge a much longer career than just about any of them. He has benefited from a pretty decent baritone, though hardly spectacular, but probably moreso from choosing good songs. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Lots to like about McKenna (when you could hear her) – Lori McKenna had lots of reasons to be in a good mood. First off, the opening band, a pop act called teenender included two of her sons. In two days, her 11th disc, "The Tree" would be released to glowing reviews. So it would seem that this homecoming show was the ideal setting with all five kids, her husband, siblings, cousins, people who... »»»
Concert Review: With Sugarland, the wait was worth it – A few songs into Sugarland's show, Kristian Bush referenced the band's five-year gap between tours saying, "A lot of people think Jennifer and I have been on a five-year vacation. Actually, we've been very busy." Clearly a lot of that time was spent in rehearsal. The duo put on a two-hour high energy gem that started out big... »»»
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