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Shelton, Ballerini, Kid Rock, Brice all out with new sounds

Friday, November 3, 2017 – Blake Shelton is out with "Texoma Shore" today. The disc features his hit single "I'll Name the Dogs," the lead-off track on the release. The 11 song release was produced by Scott Hendricks. Shelton helped write one of the songs.

Kelsea Ballerini is out with her soph release "Unapologetically" 2/12 years after her debut. Produced by Forest Glen Whitehead and Jason Massey plus Shane McAnally, Lindsay Rimes and Jimmy Robbins on a few tracks, the singer helped write a dozen songs. The release contains 12 tunes written or co-written by Ballerini. She had huge success with her debut, "The First Time," which contained hits including "Love Me Like You Mean It," "Peter Pan and "Dibs."

Kid Rock veers towards the country end with "Sweet Southern Sugar," his debut for the Broken Bow Records group. The 1`0-song disc is Kid Rock's first to be recorded in Nashville. "Tennessee Mountain Top" was released as the first single from the disc, which includes country, classic rock and rap.

Lee Brice is out with a self-titled release on Curb. The release contains 15 songs. He said on his web site, "I set out on a mission to write a groovy record with a real band playing real stuff. So I did. This is just me singing and playing alongside my band. That's my favorite part about what this record is."

Bluegrass Brad Hudson releases "Next New Heartbreak," his debut. Hudson has played with Dolly Parton (she returns the favor by singing on the release) and Lorraine Jordan and Carolina. The North Carolina native handles vocals and plays multiple instruments.

More news for Blake Shelton

CD reviews for Blake Shelton

Texoma Shore CD review - Texoma Shore
Blake Shelton's 11th studio album finds The Voice advisor in a contented, one might even say homey, frame of mind. The opening track and first single "I'll Name the Dogs" sets the tone. It's a rollicking ode to domesticity that manages to make household chore distribution ("You find the spot and I'll find the money / You be the pretty and I'll be the funny") both romantic and amusing. The beat switches to hip-hop on "Money," but the sentiment »»»
Live EP CD review - Live EP
This six-song "Blake Shelton Live EP" seems a little odd. It's not as though Shelton had an especially noteworthy tour to document. Besides, at only six songs long, it's a relatively short document, anyhow. While it may be little more than a post-it note of a project, though, it also packs a powerful punch. You recognize right away the large amount of enthusiasm the act of singing to an audience brings out of Shelton. When compared to the recorded versions of these hits, »»»
If I'm Honest CD review - If I'm Honest
Blake Shelton makes it abundantly clear that this is not going to be a light-hearted listen, despite his public demeanor. "I have never recorded a more personal or reflective album in my career," Shelton wrote on the cover insert. He said the 15-song release "touches both the highs and low of past year of my life." And that would first and foremost include his very public split with Miranda Lambert, which happened quickly and suddenly. Shelton forlornly looks back at a »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Trampled by Turtles overcome sad songs – There's light in the darkness of Trampled by Turtles. The latter is in the subject matter of the songs - there's a lot of doom and gloom in these relationships. There doesn't seem to be a lot of happy moments. As if to underscore that, the stage was often saturated in dark hues. So, where's the light? Well, despite the cup... »»»
Concert Review: Strange bedfellows be damned, Isbell, Thompson make it work no problem – It would be hard to imagine a more unlikely bill. The combination of Jason Isbell and Richard Thompson sharing the same stage might seem implausible to fans of either man. Nevertheless, the commonality found in their skills as songwriters made it all work, and though some might have some reservations about having a 50-year veteran like Thompson playing... »»»
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Life is Good on the Open Road CD review - Life is Good on the Open Road
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Last Man Standing CD review - Last Man Standing
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Graffiti U CD review - Graffiti U
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Voices CD review - Voices
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