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The Earls of Leicester win big at IBMAs

Friday, September 29, 2017 – The Earls of Leicester won the big award - Entertainer of the Year - at the IBMA awards on Thursday.

Other winners were:
Vocal Group of the Year: Flatt Lonesome
Instrumental Group of the Year: Michael Cleveland & Flamekeeper
Song of the Year: "I am a Drifter," Volume Five (written by Donna Ulisse and Marc Rossi)
Album of the Year: Balsam Range, Mountain Voodoo
Female Vocalist of the Year: Brooke Aldridge
Male Vocalist of the Year: Shawn Camp
Emerging Artist of the Year: Volume Five
Gospel Recorded Performance of the Year: Gibson Brothers' "I Found a Church Today" and Joe Mullins & Radio Ramblers' "Sacred Memories" (with Ricky Skaggs and Sharon White) (tie)
Instrumental Recorded Performance of the Year: Michael Cleveland, "Fiddler's Dream"
Recorded Event of the Year: "I've Gotta Get a Message to You," Bobby Osborne with Sierra Hull, Alison Brown, Rob Ickes, Stuart Duncan, Trey Hensley, Todd Phillips, Kenny Malone, Claire Lynch and Bryan McDowell
Banjo Player of the Year: Noam Pikelny (Punch Brothers)
Bass Player of the Year: Alan Bartram (Del McCory Band)
Dobro Player of the Year: Josh Swift (Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver)

Fiddle Player of the Year: Patrick McAvinue
Guitar Player of the Year: Molly Tuttle
Mandolin Player of the Year: Sierra Hull

Tuttle became the first female to win the guitar award.

More news for The Earls of Leicester

CD reviews for The Earls of Leicester

Earls of Leicester Live at the CMA Theater in the Country Music Hall of Fame CD review - Earls of Leicester Live at the CMA Theater in the Country Music Hall of Fame
To suggest The Earls of Leicester are bluegrass royalty is no false decree. Unlike other self - proclaimed members of the traditional hierarchy - kings, queens, dukes and such - this sextet comes by the honor naturally: it's their name! Four - time International Bluegrass Music Association Entertainers of the Year-the association's premier annual recognition-The Earls of Leicester have spent five years bringing their interpretation of peak Flatt & Scruggs-1954 through 1965-to »»»
Rattle & Roar CD review - Rattle & Roar
In the spirit of "if it was a good idea the first time around, it's got to be worth trying again," Jerry Douglas and his collaborators in the Earls Of Leicester return with a follow-up to their self-titled Grammy-winning debut of two years ago. On the off chance that you missed it the first time around, Douglas pulled the band together, not as just another "tribute" band, but to try and capture the full spirit and exceptional musicianship of the Flatt and Scruggs shows »»»
The Earls of Leicester CD review - The Earls of Leicester
In 1946, Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs were integral parts of Bill Monroe's Blue Grass Boys when they recorded a series of singles that most historians of the music consider the "birth of bluegrass" as we know it, though the term "bluegrass" would not come into widespread use for another decade or so. Upon leaving to form their own band, The Foggy Mountain Boys (much to Monroe's consternation), they spent most of the 1950s recording one landmark single after another. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Lane, Ramsey, Barrett cover their bases – Covers played a far more prominent role than usual at a country show. And instead of what is typically the least course of resistance in recent years of country artists succumbing to their renditions of a rock hit, Chris Lane, Mason Ramsey and Gabby Barrett played songs that actually were country hits. Interestingly, the youngest of the bunch, Ramsey,... »»»
Concert Review: Mumford and Sons up to snuff, for the most part – Mumford and Sons have always played it smart when it has come to career moves. They have not overtoured by becoming regular fixtures on the touring circuit. Their M.O. is to tour just enough upon an album release and then disappear for a stretch. Ditto for releasing new music ("Delta" just came out last month, Mumford's first release... »»»
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