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Rhett dominates chart

Tuesday, September 19, 2017 – Thomas Rhett dominated the Billboard charts for the week ending Sept. 30 with his new disc, "Life Changes,' which was the top selling country in the U.S. Rhett also landed nine songs on the Top Country Songs chart. Sam Hunt yet again was first on the songs chart, though, with "Beauty Like a Back Road."

Kane Brown held second again with "What Ifs," his song featuring Lauren Alaina. Dustin Lynch remained third with "Small Town Boy." Rhett was fourth, up three, with "Unforgettable." Luke Combs was fifth with "When It Rains It Pours." Rhett also was ninth with "Craving You," his son with Maren Morris, which was back up three. Blake Shelton jumped from 40 to 10 with "I'll Name the Dogs."

Brown debuted at 13 with "Found You." Rhett also debuted at 23 with "Marry Me," was at 33 with "Sixteen," up 11, "35 with "Grave," up 6, 3 with "Leave Right Now," "Sweetheart" at 41, "Drink a Little Beer" at 42 featuring his father, Rhett Akins, and "When You Look Like that" at 49.

Kid Rock debuted at 36 with "Tennessee Mountain Top."

On the albums chart, Lynch debuted in second with "Current Mood" and Kip Moore third with "Slowheart." Brown was fourth with his self-titled debut. Combs fell from first to fifth with "This One's For You." Toby Keith debuted at six with "The Bus Songs."

The late Don William was at 14 with "20 Greatest Hits." The Texas Tenors debuted at 17 with "Rise." Montgomery Gentry was 18th with "Playlist: The Very Best of Montgomery Gentry" following the death of Troy Gentry.

On the Bluegrass Albums chart, Alison Krauss remained first with "Windy City." Sarah Jarosz was second with "Undercurrent,' Bradley Walker third with "Call Me Old-fashioned," Old Crow Medicine Show fourth with '50 Years of Blonde on Blonde" and Dailey & Vincent fifth with "Patriots And Poets."

On the Americana/Folk Albums chart, Jack Johnson was first with "All the Light Above It Too." The late Gregg Allman debuted in second with "Southern Blood,' Neil Young third with "Hitchhiker." Chris Stapleton's "Traveller," last week's chart topper, fell to fourth. He also was fifth with "From a Room: Volume 1."

On the top 200, Lynch was 7th, Moore 10th, Brown 30th and Combs 35th.

More news for Thomas Rhett

CD reviews for Thomas Rhett

Life Changes CD review - Life Changes
Thomas Rhett references mangoritas, Coldplay and verified Instagram accounts on his third album, and for some, that may be a deal-breaker. His ultra-contemporary style and pop culture smarts may be anathema for fans of traditional country. However, writing Rhett off by stamping a cowboy boot and hollering "That ain't country!" writes off some truly standout songs - created by combining the best elements of country and pop music. Take the sophisticated songwriting of country and the »»»
Tangled Up CD review - Tangled Up
Thomas Rhett picks up where he left off on his 2013 debut, "It Goes Like This," which netted three chart toppers. Rhett would be hard to categorize as country, although in the big tent philosophy of what passes these days, country serves more as a marketing niche. He's more soul, funk and hip hop than country. His catchy, bouncy "Crash and Burn," another number one song, is squarely soulful pop with a few small sonic tweaks (whistles, backing "uhs" near the end) »»»
It Goes Like This CD review - It Goes Like This
Thomas Rhett has enjoyed a strong pedigree as a hit songwriter at the tender age of 23. After all, he has helped pen Jason Aldean's 1994,Parking Lot Party by Lee Brice and Round Here by Florida Georgia Line. Not to mention having a father, Rhett Atkins, who has enjoyed both a career as a recording artist and a hit songwriter himself (he also helped write five of the dozen songs). So, it should come as no surprise that Rhett shares a lot of the same clichés as those he has written hits for. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: No lead singer? No problem for The Earls of Leicester – The Earls of Leicester have been in a bind that could have caused other bands to cancel the show. The bluegrass band's lead singer Shawn Camp has suffered from laryngitis for 11 days. What to do? Put the vocals on the cords mainly of acoustic guitarist Jeff White and to a lesser extent Dobro player supreme Jerry Douglas.... »»»
Concert Review: At Newport Folk Festival, discovery rules – One of the enduring highlights of the Newport Folk Festival is the chance of discovery. This is not a festival filled with superstars. Far from it. Yes, there are veterans, who already have made a name for themselves (Brandi Carlile would fill the bill), and there are others who don't even know themselves how they landed in Newport.... »»»
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