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Vince Gill stays busy, real busy

Tuesday, October 9, 2007 – Incoming Country Music Hall of Fame member Vince Gill won't be sitting still this month between a slew of appearances in New York and Nashville, including stops at NBC-TV, the Nokia Theater Times Square, the Grand Ole Opry, the Medallion ceremony at the Country Music Hall of Fame, the Ryman Auditorium and RFD-TV.

On Wednesday, Oct. 10, Gill joins Jewel, Trisha Yearwood and Patty Griffin at the Nokia Theater Times Square for an "All For The Hall" fundraiser to benefit the Country Music Hall of Fame & Museum. Actor, director and novelist Ethan Hawke will host the event. A live auction is included. Gill is now in his sixth term as president of the Hall of Fame's board of officers and trustees.

Gill and his wife and fellow artist Amy Grant will be jointly profiled Saturday, Oct. 13, on NBC-TV's Weekend Today. Grant will spotlight her "Greatest Hits" album and her latest book, "Mosaic: Pieces Of My Life So Far."

It's back to the country on Monday, Oct. 22 as Gill visits RFD-TV to chat with his fellow Hall of Fame inductee, Ralph Emery, on the show Ralph Emery Live.

A Grand Ole Opry member since 1991, Vince will recall the thrill of becoming a part of that revered musical institution when he welcomes MCA Records labelmate Josh Turner into the cast on Saturday, Oct. 27.

The next day, Sunday, Oct. 28, Gill will be one of the three guests of honor at the annual Medallion ceremony at the Country Music Hall of Fame & Museum. The private event pays tribute to new Hall of Fame members, who this year are Gill, Ralph Emery and Mel Tillis.

The following evening, Monday, Oct. 29, Gill and Tillis will journey to the Ryman Auditorium to perform for the 650 AM WSM 82nd Anniversary Listener Appreciation Concert. Emery will host.

At the CMA Awards show on Wednesday, Nov. 7, Gill will be formally inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame. In addition to being nominated for Album of the Year, he is also in the running for Vocal Event of the Year (for "The Reasons Why," with Alison Krauss.)

On Tuesday, Nov. 20, fans can purchase the Crossroads Guitar Festival 2007 From Chicago DVD. The two-disc set includes six of Gill's performances: "Sweet Thing," "Country Boy" (with Albert Lee), "If It Makes You Happy" (with Sheryl Crow and Albert Lee), "Tulsa Time" (with Sheryl Crow, Eric Clapton and Albert Lee), "Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain" (with Willie Nelson and Albert Lee) and "On The Road Again" (with Willie Nelson, Sheryl Crow and Albert Lee).

More news for Vince Gill

CD reviews for Vince Gill

Down to My Last Bad Habit CD review - Down to My Last Bad Habit
At this point in his career, Vince Gill could just as well have entitled this "Tried and True." He's not chasing trends - pop country or bro country - of chart-geared songs. He's too old for that, and at this point anyway, Gill knows what works for him. And there is quite a lot that works on his first solo album since 2011's "Guitar Slinger." (He did release the excellent "Bakersfield" with Paul Franklin in 2013). Gill prefers a more soulful approach, »»»
Guitar Slinger CD review - Guitar Slinger
It's hard to believe, considering what Vince Gill has accomplished over the past three decades, but the triple threat singer-songwriter-guitar picker may be in the most creative, productive stretch of his lengthy, remarkable career. Five years after Gill's Grammy-winning 4-album 43-song box set "These Days," his latest 12-song release again finds Gill tapping every ounce of his immense talents. The title song sums up his reputation as an ax man worthy of playing Eric »»»
These Days CD review - These Days
To put this release into perspective, it would take Axl Rose the better half of a century to issue the same amount of material. Fortunately, Vince Gill is about as prolific as they come these days, and this daring four-disc release only is further proof of that. Each disc is divvied up depending on his mood, with the opening "Working On A Big Chill" album being "The Rockin' Record." And this album sets things off right with the lovely mid-tempo and groovy title track. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Hard Working Americans more than live up to moniker – Hard Working Americans is a generic enough sounding term, conveying that you're part of the lunch bucket crowd. Part of a faceless pack instead of an individual. In reality, it's something of a misnomer for the sextet of the same name heretofore considered a side project. That's because they or in most cases, their other... »»»
Concert Review: Wolf rolls on with ease – Peter Wolf starts off his first disc in six years, "A Cure for Loneliness," with "Rolling On." Great title for a song, and as he would prove in concert, he lived up to those words. The song starts "You can lay down and die / You can lay up and count the tears you've cried / But baby, that's not me / There's a... »»»
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