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Those Darlins lead singer passes

Wednesday, September 13, 2017 – Jessi Zazu, singer of Those Darlins, a country and rock band, passed away on Tuesday at 28 of cervical cancer.

Zazu died surrounded by family, friends and fellow musicians who lined the waiting room inside Centennial Hospital's intensive care unit. Zazu, who was born Jessi Zazu Wariner, but went by her first name and band name, went public about her illness and posted a picture of herself with a shaved head, wearing a t-shirt that said "No fear.

"Yesterday I said goodbye to my best friend, long time partner in crime and hero, Jessi Zazu Wariner," Regensburg said. "She maintained a sense of humor and a commanding presence up until and through her final moments. She was in the company of those who cared deeply about her and who she cared deeply about."

"Shout-out to your contagious spirit that inspired all who crossed it. Shout-out to the creative dynamo who continued to flourish even against insurmountable odds. Shout-out to all the little triumphs over the last 16 months. Shout-out to the ridiculous van rides and the fights and to the fact that we never turned our backs on one another over the last decade. Shout-out to the dreams we made and the ones left to come. And shout-out to all of you who have supported her until the end."

Zazu joined joined Nikki Kvarnes and Kelley Anderson to form Those Darlins in 2008. Linwood Regensburg become the fourth official member soon after. The band launched its own label, Oh Wow Dang, with the help of their manager John Turner and Nashville's Thirty Tigers.

The band's first EP, "Wild One," came out that same year followed by a self-titled debut LP the following year. They went onto record two more albums, "Screws Get Loose" (2011) and "Blur The Line" (2013), along with several EPs and singles.

The band exhibited a rough sounding country sound, which veered more towards rock over the year. Those Darlins toured across the U.S. numerous times.

Those Darlins went on official hiatus in late 2015 and in early 2016, just weeks after finishing the band's farewell tour, Zazu was diagnosed with cervical cancer. Since her diagnosis she continued to work on music alongside Regensburg.

Throughout her career, she was actively involved in social justice. For over a decade, she also worked with the Southern Girls Rock and Roll Camp, which she attended first as a camper. This past year, Zazu and the camp set up an "Ain't Afraid Scholarship" that went to all campers that applied.

"Attending these camps as a young person really gave me the tools I needed to blossom creatively in safe and encouraging environments. After attending camp for 4 years and volunteering for the last 11 years, it's something near and dear to my heart...Every year I meet more and more young kids who are so thoughtful, caring, considerate, aware and full of so much enthusiasm for the future...(Rock Camp) really changes their lives to have an outlet to express themselves and learn about how to navigate a world such as the one we live in."

Zazu also focused on her art and was included in a show this past June at the Julia Martin Gallery where her work as well as her mother Kathy Wariner's were displayed. She also contributed work to Vanderbilt's Cancer Center. Darling said, "I wanted it to be something that was inspiring to people because I looked around in the waiting rooms, and I could see there were a lot of people who looked like they were having a hard time. It's not always about being able to land a punch; it's being able to take a punch. Not just that, but take a break and have your team come in and fix yourself back up."

She also designed the book jacket and illustrations for music critic and NPR correspondent Ann Powers' recent book "Good Booty."

To cover her medical bills, Zazu eventually set up a YouCaring page to help defray the costs. She documented shaving her head and also designed t-shirts that said, "Ain't Afraid" in stark red letters. Sales from the shirts helped raise more than $50,000 toward her medical bills.

Zazu is survived by her mother Kathy Wariner, her father David Wariner and her brothers Emmett Wariner and Oakley Wariner.

A memorial fund is being set up for a public memorial.

More news for Those Darlins

CD reviews for Those Darlins

Screws Get Loose CD review - Screws Get Loose
At first glance, the young, often clothing-deprived women in Those Darlins come off as pure novelty, a creation aimed at pleasing libidos rather than ears. So when their 2009 debut album was released, its success amongst even jaded music critics was a pleasant surprise. The band, made up of a trio of women on guitar, bass and ukulele, as well as a male drummer, specialize in lowbrow, but witty ditties that often focus on getting drunk and eating chicken. Hailing from Tennessee, their first album »»»
Those Darlins CD review - Those Darlins
Those Darlins are not exactly country, and they're not precisely punk (their tattoos may help in that respect), but the three young Murfreesboro, Tenn. Darlins (that's the surname the three women - Nikki on ukelele/vocals, Jessi on guitar/bass/vocals and Kelley on bass/guitar/vocals - use) make a lot of good music on their full-length debut. There's a care-free, fun attitude merging both country and punk from the start of Red Light Love. That vibe continues on DUI or Die. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Turner pleases the traditionalists – Josh Turner is a hard-working citizen, a man of faith and a loyal father and husband. He also happens to be one of the youngest members inducted to the Grand Ole Opry. In short, he is the embodiment of country music's champion of the everyman. This night was special for him. He was celebrating an anniversary with his wife and his 18th with his label MCA.... »»»
Concert Review: Not much really changes for LaFarge – Just one look at the stage made it clear that this was not going to be a typical night with Pokey LaFarge. There were only a few guitars to be seen, which meant that LaFarge was going it alone. "I've been touring for years with a band," LaFarge told perhaps a few hundred people before he had even played a note.... »»»
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