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Shelton helps open hometown nightspot

Tuesday, September 5, 2017 – Blake Shelton will help open Ole Red Tishomingo, a restaurant, live music venue and retail space on Sept. 30 in his hometown of Tishomingo, Okla.

The themed entertainment venue was inspired by Shelton's "Ol' Red," one of the superstar's earliest career-defining songs.

RaeLynn and Opry members Jeannie Seely, John Conlee, and Ronnie Milsap will play at the opening. Shelton will co-host the Sept. 30 show with 650 AM WSM's Bill Cody. The free "Blake & Friends" concert will begin at 7 p.m. Central and will be livestreamed on Ole Red's Facebook page.

"For a song that meant so much to me to take this shape and come to life as Ole Red has is really mind-blowing," said Shelton. "Our community is in for a treat with the Opry bringing their famed broadcast to Tishomingo for this special show. It's a proud day for us Oklahomans."

Colin Reed, chairman and chief executive officer of Ryman Hospitality Properties, said, "The Ole Red brand is all about celebrating the country lifestyle, and that is why we have chosen to open the first location in a town that is so close to Blake's heart. Ole Red Tishomingo is a special place where people can experience southern Oklahoma living at its best, and we look forward to debuting it with help from Blake and members of our Opry family."

The grand opening festivities begin on Sept. 29 when Shelton will perform a private concert from the Ole Red Tishomingo stage. Proceeds from will benefit the non-profit J.C. Reaching Out, a local charity that provides financial assistance to family members of people battling cancer. A total of 130 tickets will be sold at $200 apiece and will be available on olered.com beginning Sept. 6 at 10 a.m. central.

Ole Red Tishomingo opens just a few months before Ole Red Nashville, a multi-level 26,000-square-foot entertainment venue in the heart of Nashville's Lower Broadway. Expected to open in the spring of 2018, Ole Red Nashville includes a two-story bar and restaurant, retail area, performance space, dance floor, private event space, and a 6,000-square-foot rooftop with an indoor/outdoor bar and restaurant featuring panoramic views of Lower Broadway.

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Concert Review: It's no wonder that 10 String Symphony stays busy – To say that Rachel Baiman has been busy might be an understatement. Last year, she released the very fine "Shame" CD and toured behind that. Just last month, she and musical collaborator Christian Sedelmyer put out their third album, "Generation Frustration," under the moniker 10 String Symphony. The two were on an ultra-short tour... »»»
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