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Rose follows a new "Route"

Monday, August 7, 2017 – Traditional country singer Whitney Rose returns in October with a new disc, "Rule 62."

And what is Rule 62? "Don't Take Yourself Too Damn Seriously," which is based on Alcoholics Anonymous view.

The album is due out on Oct. 6 on Six Shooter Records through Thirty Tigers.

This will be Rose's second release this year as she released the "South Texas Suite EP in January, an ode to Texas country music. Days before the EP hit the streets and Rose kicked off a four-month worldwide tour, Rose hit Nashville, where she entered BlackBird Studio A to reconvene with The Mavericks' Raul Malo to produce the new release In one week, Rose, Malo and co-producer Niko Bolas readied the 11-song disc, including 9 self-penned.

"Can't Stop Shakin'" was recorded on Jan. 20. With Malo on harmonies and rhythm guitars, Kenny Vaughn on lead guitar, and saxophones and organ in the mix, "Can't Stop Shakin'" was originally written as an anti-anxiety treatment in Memphis soul dance party form. The meaning has changed.

"'Can't Stop Shakin' started out as something I would sing to calm myself down." Rose said. "We recorded that song on Inauguration day and you could physically feel the divide between the public and the unrest in the air. I was in the studio that week every day for 12 hours on average, so realized my contribution was going to have to take place within the walls of Blackbird. So the song that started as a personal anthem got a rewrite that day."

As for including Bolas on production, "Niko brought a lot to the table in the studio (when he wasn't sitting at his table at Waffle House). It allowed Raul to step down from the producer role from time to time and be a part of the band. That man can play and sing. One of my favorite parts of the album is the guitar solo on 'You Never Cross My Mind' - that's all Raul," Rose said.

Other musicians in the studio included Paul Deakin (The Mavericks) on drums, Jay Weaver (Dolly Parton, Tanya Tucker, The Mavericks) on bass; Jen Gunderman (Sheryl Crow) on piano; Chris Scruggs (Marty Stuart) on steel; Aaron Till (Asleep at the Wheel) on the fiddle; and Vaughn (Marty Stuart, Lucinda Williams) on lead guitar.

The track listing is:
1. I Don't Want Half (I Just Want Out) (3:06)
2. Arizona (3:58)
3. Better to My Baby (3:13)
4. You Never Cross My Mind (4:02)
5. You Don't Scare Me (4:14)
6. Can't Stop Shakin' (4:22)
7. Tied to the Wheel (4:41)
8. Trucker's Funeral (5:04)
9. Wake Me in Wyoming (3:29)
10. You're a Mess (3:48)
11. Time to Cry (3:56)

More news for Whitney Rose

CD reviews for Whitney Rose

South Texas Suite CD review - South Texas Suite
Whitney Rose firmly establishes herself as a worthy member of the Margo Price and Kacey Musgraves School of Country. There is far more to the connection than Rose sporting a bouffant on the cover. What you're going to hear is what some folks refer to as "real country," aka traditional country. If looking for blaring guitars, drums pounding and singalong anthems, Rose is not going to cut it for you. That's certainly not what this Canadian-born , Austin-based singer is about. »»»
Heartbreaker of the Y ear CD review - Heartbreaker of the Y ear
On her second album, crooner Whitney Rose, who grew up learning to love classic country like Hank Williams in her grandparents' bar on Prince Edward Island, Canada, where she also got her first listen to The Mavericks and other rock and pop-inflected country. On "Heartbreaker of the Year," she calls on the talents of The Mavs' lead singer Raul Malo to produce as well as backing her on guitar, percussion and vocals. She assembled a group of stellar musicians to back her on this »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Henry comes out the other end a better man – Joe Henry mentioned at the outset that this show was not only the record release celebration, but also the anniversary - to the day - of when he was diagnosed with prostate cancer. Although the songs from this fine new album do not address his illness directly, they many times touch upon the big issues of human existence (life, death and the meaning of it all).... »»»
Concert Review: What's in a name? Strings lives up to it – Billy Strings may not be his real name, but the bluegrass performer more than lives up to his adopted moniker. Bluegrass may not be the first style of music when one thinks of William Apostol's (yup, that's Billy's real name) home state of Michigan, but with more miles on the bus and shows like this outstanding, lengthy, lyrical night... »»»
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