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Parmalee, Evans release new sounds

Friday, July 21, 2017 – Parmalee released its second major label album, while Sara Evans has gone her own way.

Parmalee pays tribute to its North Carolina roots with "27861," the zip code where the quartet grew up. After three indie album releases, the group gained acclaim with its 2013 release "Feels Like Carolina," which yielded "Carolina," "Close Your Eyes" and "Already Callin' You Mine" as hits. The new release contains a dozen songs with "Sunday Morning" the current single.

Evans is out with "Words" on her own Born to Fly Records. The 14-song collection features 14 separate female writers, including Ashley Monroe, Hillary Lindsey, Hillary Scott of Lady Antebellum and Sonya Evans. Evans worked with co-producer Mark Bright, who also performed the chores for "Real Fine Place' in 2005 and "Slow Me Down" in 2014. The lead single is "Marquee Sign," which also includes her daughter, Olivia Evans, 14.

Several bluegrass albums also were released today. The Farm Hands, a quartet from Nashville, is out with "Colors," featuring the single "Rural Route." The group consists of Tim Graves on resophonic guitar, Daryl Mosley, Keith Tew and Don Hill. Kimberly Bibb joins them on fiddle.

Eddy Raven, better known as a country singer, recorded his first bluegrass album, "All Grassed Up," with Carolina Road. Raven, 72, has been known for Cajun-styled country music. He has charted more than 35 singles in his career, including the number 1 hits "I Got Mexico", "Shine, Shine, Shine," "I'm Gonna Get You," "Joe Knows How to Live," "In a Letter to You" and "Bayou Boys." Carolina Road is Lorraine Jordan's backing band.

Kim Robins is out with "Raining in Baltimore," which was produced by Ron Stewart and Ricky Wasson. Adam Steffey, Harold Nixon and Stewart are among those playing on the disc. This is Robins' debut for the label after the Indiana native released a disc independently.

More news

CD reviews

Words
You gotta love country music, which still demonizes tobacco just like a Baptist Church Sunday sermon. "Marquee Sign," off Sara Evans' "Word" album begins with the country star announcing, "I wish you were a pack of cigarettes/'Cause you would have come with a warning." Cigarettes, like the tequila she sings about later, are clearly bad for you. Unfortunately, the man in this song didn't come labeled with a skull and cross bones. The album from whence »»»
27861 CD review - 27861
We're in the dog days of summer and Parmalee is ready to party. They began work on "27861" (the North Carolina zip code they all lived in and which each band member has tattooed on him somewhere) with about 35 songs that were eventually pared down to the 12 that make up the final track list. They serve up a dozen tales primarily of sandy white beaches, mimosas and a whole lot of lighthearted summertime vibe. The album sets the tone early with the one two punch of a Jake Owen/Kenny »»»
At Christmas CD review - At Christmas
Sara Evans is straight-up one of the best singers in country music, and when she performs "Go Tell It On The Mountain" backed by a supportive choir on her new holiday offering, "At Christmas," the girl is squarely in her element. She has the kind of strong voice that gives this lyric the spiritual declarative quality it requires. And yet, she can switch to the acoustic guitar-backed "Oh Come All Ye Faithful" and sing ever so prettily and quietly. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Mumford and Sons up to snuff, for the most part – Mumford and Sons have always played it smart when it has come to career moves. They have not overtoured by becoming regular fixtures on the touring circuit. Their M.O. is to tour just enough upon an album release and then disappear for a stretch. Ditto for releasing new music ("Delta" just came out last month, Mumford's first release... »»»
Concert Review: Despite small crowd, Hood accomplishes mission – It would have been quite easy to think that Adam Hood would have mailed in this gig. It could not have been easy to make your debut in the Boston area after putting out seven albums, not to mention having songs picked by A list artists, and having maybe 25 people show up. If the Alabama native was dissuaded by the small crowd, he did not show it.... »»»
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