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LRB, Banditos, Nile drop music

Friday, June 23, 2017 – Lonesome River Band, Banditos and Willie Nile are out with new CDs today.

Lonesome River Band's "Mayhayley's House" (Mountain Home), mines bluegrass with a tad of country. The veteran group is Sammy Shelor on bass; Brandon Rickman on guitar and lead vocals; Mike Hartgrove on fiddle; Barry Reed on upright bass; Jesse Smathers on lead vocals and mandolin; and Tony Creasman on drums.

Willie Nile pays tribute to mainly '60s vintage Bob Dylan on "Positively Bob Willie Nile Sings Bob Dylan" (River House). Dylan was a major influence on the singer, who's been making music for more than three decades.

Banditos continue offering a variety of musical identities on "Visionland" (Bloodshot), the group's second full length. Banditos produced along with Israel Nash and Ted Young.

More news for Lonesome River Band

CD reviews for Lonesome River Band

Mayhayley's House CD review - Mayhayley's House
For years, Lonesome River Band was proud to be "Carrying The Tradition" of bluegrass music. Then, with last year's release they began the process of "Bridging The Tradition" of bluegrass to something a little more progressive, a little more modern. Now, "Mayhayley's House" proves that LRB is continuing across that bridge. What is ironic, or funny, is that Mayhayley Lancaster, from whom the project takes its name, was known for resisting modernization and »»»
Bridging the Tradition CD review - Bridging the Tradition
There aren't a lot of bluegrass bands that can boast that they've lasted more than a quarter-century on the national scene, but the history of the Lonesome River Band as one of the most competent and dependable bands in the business goes back to the late 1980s. Banjo player Sammy Shelor's tenure doesn't go back quite that far, having joined "only" in 1990, but for the past 15 years, he's been the leader and front man. If the title of their newest release sounds a »»»
Turn on a Dime CD review - Turn on a Dime
Sammy Shelor's banjo playing is just one facet of another great CD from the Lonesome River Band. Shelor is one of the top banjo players on the circuit, and he always has a great band. Brandon Rickman plays guitar and sings half the leads. He also co-wrote three of the songs. "Lila Mae" and "Hurting With My Broken Heart" are love gone wrong songs while "If The Moon Never Sees the Light of Day" celebrates a good love affair. Mandolinist Randy Jones shares the »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Womack planned a good night – Lee Ann Womack pretty much summed up where she's at these days in concluding her show with Don Williams "Lord I Hope This Day Is Good." The ever-strong voiced country traditionalist sang, "I don't need fortune and I don't need fame" with the concluding line of the stanza asking the Man upstairs to "plan a good day for me.... »»»
Concert Review: Cantrell continues to satisfy – Laura Cantrell may never be a country star. Not at this stage of her career when she's 50, touring here and there and releasing new music every few years or so. But five albums in, Cantrell continues as a warm, enjoyable and worthy purveyor of her brand of country. That would mean going towards a more traditional side, not rushing the songs... »»»
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Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

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Seasons Change CD review - Seasons Change
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17th Avenue Revival CD review - 17th Avenue Revival
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Right or Wrong CD review - Right or Wrong
Dave Adkins stepped to the plate and swung for the fences. His monster swing found the sweet spot and delivered a game-winning home run. "Right or Wrong" is filled with hot picking, great vocal presentations and a risk or two that absolutely pay off. If Adkins was trying to outshine previous releases, he may have done so.  »»»