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Disc tributes Gentle Giant

Tuesday, February 7, 2017 – The Gentle Giant, Don Williams, may have retired last year, but his music certainly is not being forgotten.

Williams' longtime producer Garth Fundis has produced a tribute album, "Gentle Giants: The Songs of Don Williams," featuring Dierks Bentley, Garth Brooks, Brandy Clark, Jason Isbell & Amanda Shires, Alison Krauss, Lady Antebellum, Keb' Mo', Pistol Annies, John Prine, Chris and Morgane Stapleton and Trisha Yearwood. The 11-track album will be released on Slate Creek Records on Friday, May 26, in honor of Williams' birthday the following day.

"It has been my privilege to work frequently with Don through the years, and I'm proud to honor him with this new project," said Fundis. "All of the artists on the album have been huge Don Williams fans for years. It makes the entire project very personal and very meaningful."

Songs on the CD are:
1. "Tulsa Time" - Pistol Annies
2. "I Believe in You" - Brandy Clark
3. "We've Got a Good Fire Goin'" - Lady Antebellum
4. "Some Broken Hearts Never Mend" - Dierks Bentley
5. "Amanda" - Chris Stapleton feat. Morgane Stapleton
6. "Till The Rivers All Run Dry" - Alison Krauss
7. "Love Is On A Roll" - John Prine feat. Roger Cook
8. "If I Needed You" - Jason Isbell & Amanda Shires
9. "Maggie's Dream" - Trisha Yearwood
10. "Lord I Hope This Day is Good" - Keb' Mo'
11. "Good Ole Boys Like Me" - Garth Brooks

All guest artist performances were donated in support of MusiCares, the charitable foundation created by The Recording Academy, which offers assistance for those in the music field in times of need. The services cover a wide range of financial, medical and personal emergencies. The foundation will receive a majority of the proceeds from the sale of the album.

Williams charted 56 records and scored at least one major hit every year between 1974 and 1991. He won the CMA Male Vocalist of the Year Award in 1978 and 1 CMA Album of the Year Award (for "I Believe in You") in 1981. His hit "Tulsa Time" was the ACM Single of the Year Award winner in 1978; the organization presnted him with the Cliffie Stone Pioneer Award in 2006.

The Texas native earned country music's highest honor in 2010 when he was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame.

More news for Don Williams

CD reviews for Don Williams

Reflections CD review - Reflections
Listening to Don Williams is like putting on that old flannel shirt you've had since your college days; it's a comfortable fit, soft and reassuring without looking too much like something your dad might own. Williams' style of country music isn't much in fashion these days, but it carries a bit of a timeless quality with it - like George Strait, this new album could have come out any time in Williams' career. Some of that is due to the sympathetic ears of his longtime »»»
So It Goes CD review - So It Goes
Don Williams is among the country artists who have been as steady and consistent as they come. Now at the tender age of 73, Williams' bass-baritone timbre hasn't been ravaged one bit by Father Time. This latest album - his first since 2004 - is no exception with Williams offering up "Better Than Today" in a true, toe-tapping country style. From there, the singer slows the album down for a ballad Heart Of Hearts that has just the right combination of grace and musicianship. »»»
My Heart To You
Don Williams made some of the best country music records of the 1980s, like, "Good Old Boys Like Me." His understated charms seem to have been lost in the shuffle when one considers the names brought up as classic singers - Jones, Haggard, Gosdin...but not the man once dubbed the, "Gentle Giant," for his tall stature and mellow voice. Williams has never really stopped recording new material, though his hit-making Nashville days are behind him. This latest disc has some songs that should hold up »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Mumford and Sons up to snuff, for the most part – Mumford and Sons have always played it smart when it has come to career moves. They have not overtoured by becoming regular fixtures on the touring circuit. Their M.O. is to tour just enough upon an album release and then disappear for a stretch. Ditto for releasing new music ("Delta" just came out last month, Mumford's first release... »»»
Concert Review: Despite small crowd, Hood accomplishes mission – It would have been quite easy to think that Adam Hood would have mailed in this gig. It could not have been easy to make your debut in the Boston area after putting out seven albums, not to mention having songs picked by A list artists, and having maybe 25 people show up. If the Alabama native was dissuaded by the small crowd, he did not show it.... »»»
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