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Worsham looks to "Beginning of Things"

Monday, January 23, 2017 – Charlie Worsham will finally release his sophomore disc in April.

Worsham, who debuted in 2013, will be out with "Beginning of Things" on April 21. The title track premiered today at NPR Music with five songs available this Friday.

Co-produced by Frank Liddell (Miranda Lambert, Lee Ann Womack, Aubrie Sellers) and Eric Masse (Rayland Baxter, Mikky Ekko), "Beginning of Things" includes 13 new songs, 9 of which Worsham co-wrote.

"We had so much fun," Worsham said. "I had fallen out of love with music and making this record put me back in love with it on a level I hadn't felt since I was a teenager. 'Beginning Of Things' was a challenge in surrendering control and trusting my own talent. I'm confident that these songs and these recordings capture my musical geography and personal truth, and at the end of the day, I'm convinced that is the ultimate purpose of an artist - to speak one's truth."

Born and raised in Mississippi, Worsham studied at Berklee College of Music in Boston. He moved to Nashville where he was a member of KingBilly, which received some acclaim, but never broke. He later signed with Warner, releasing "Rubberband" in 2013. Worsham released the singles "Could It Be" and "Want Me Too." While both charted, "Could It Be" rose to 28 on Billboard and "Want Me Too" to 46.

The track list on the new disc is is:
1. Pants (Jeff Hyde)
2. Please People Please (Charlie Worsham, Ryan Tyndell)
3. Southern By The Grace of God (Charlie Worsham, Luke Dick, Shane McAnally)
4. Call You Up (Abe Stoklasa, Daniel Tashian)
5. Lawn Chair Don't Care (Charlie Worsham, Brent Cobb, Ryan Tyndell)
6. Only Way To Fly (Charlie Worsham, Brent Cobb, Ryan Tyndell)
7. Old Times Sake (Charlie Worsham, Jeremy Spillman, Brent Cobb)
8. Cut Your Groove (Charlie Worsham, Oscar Charles)
9. I Ain't Goin' Nowhere (Charlie Worsham, Ryan Tyndell, Billy Montana)
10. The Beginning Of Things (Abe Stoklasa, Donovan Woods)
11. Birthday Suit (Luke Dick, Jason Lehning)
12. I-55 (Charlie Worsham, Ben Hayslip)
13. Take Me Drunk (Charlie Worsham, Ryan Tyndell, Steve Bogard)

More news for Charlie Worsham

CD reviews for Charlie Worsham

Rubberband CD review - Rubberband
Newcomer Charlie Worsham doesn't sound so new once the music starts. In fact, Keith Urban serves as a ready made launching pad for the Mississippi native. Worsham sounds remarkably like the Aussie vocally on the lead-off and very catchy Could It Be, the first single. One could easily imagine Urban would be comfortable singing this smooth, a tad soulful, upbeat sounding song. And the Urban connection seems most apt as Worsham continues living in the shadow of the superstar for awhile among »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Mumford and Sons up to snuff, for the most part – Mumford and Sons have always played it smart when it has come to career moves. They have not overtoured by becoming regular fixtures on the touring circuit. Their M.O. is to tour just enough upon an album release and then disappear for a stretch. Ditto for releasing new music ("Delta" just came out last month, Mumford's first release... »»»
Concert Review: Despite small crowd, Hood accomplishes mission – It would have been quite easy to think that Adam Hood would have mailed in this gig. It could not have been easy to make your debut in the Boston area after putting out seven albums, not to mention having songs picked by A list artists, and having maybe 25 people show up. If the Alabama native was dissuaded by the small crowd, he did not show it.... »»»
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