Sign up for newsletter
 

Rogers becomes owner of Texas country club

Thursday, December 22, 2016 – Randy Rogers and a business partner purchased a well-known Texas country music club on Tuesday, he announced today.

Rogers, along with partner KRR Entertainment, became the official owner of the Cheatham Street Warehouse in San Marcos, Texas. Kent Finlay founded, owned and operated Cheatham Street from 1974 up until his death on Texas Independence Day in 2015.

KRR Entertainment is an Austin based event production company that co-founded Lone Star Jam and produces events at the Nutty Brown Amphitheatre.

In 1975, George Strait made his debut at the venue, and Guy Clark once sat in with Townes Van Zandt, playing well past midnight closing time. In 1980, Stevie Ray Vaughan had a regular Tuesday night gig, and Charlie and Will Sexton, then 12 and 10, would open for Vaughn and sometimes join him on stage. There was a time when each Strait and Vaughan played one night a week at the venue.

"I still get butterflies when I step on that stage. I'm going to make sure other songwriters and musicians young and old get to experience that same feeling for many years to come. That's my goal," says Rogers, who purchased from Kent Finlay's children, Jenni, Sterling and HalleyAnna.

In 2000, Rogers was a student at then Southwest Texas State University, pursuing a mass marketing degree. Every Wednesday, he would make his way to the building by the railroad tracks to perform the open songwriter night.

He credited those songwriter nights for kick starting his career. Those nights spawned his relationship with Finlay.

Rogers met and formed Randy Rogers Band within the walls of Cheatham Street, and when they signed their first major label deal years later, they did it there, with Finlay by their sides.

Although a few cosmetic changes and updates are in the works - addition of a permanent patio and food service at the top of the list - the primary goal is to maintain the character of the venue.

More news for Randy Rogers Band

CD reviews for Randy Rogers Band

Nothing Shines Like Neon CD review - Nothing Shines Like Neon
Randy Rogers Band's latest album cover provides insight into the music contained within. The brightly lit neon sign is a familiar sight to those who frequent honky tonks and smoky barrooms. The Texas country band plays music that is designed specifically for these locations and crowds within. Almost every song on this album has alcohol as one of the main characters. Fresh on the heels of Rogers' excellent twang filled collaboration with Wade Bowen, he returns with his full band with a »»»
Trouble
With "Trouble" the Randy Rogers Band seems to be attempting to straddle the line between hard-edged Texas alternative country and slick Nashville mainstream. Rogers is at his best when he sticks to alt.-country, as with the rocker Fuzzy in which he vaguely recalls the alcohol influenced events from the previous evening ("Who the hell is Heather/And when were we together/Cause I've got every letter of her name on my chest"). Similarly the bluesy Shotgun »»»
Burning The Day CD review - Burning The Day
An improvement over their previous, self-titled album, the Randy Rogers Band sounds like the weary Texas country band they were always meant to be. Produced by Paul Worley, this is a fairly straightforward collection of songs that, while not quite reaching the heights his classic "RollerCoaster," reached back in the mid-2000's, show RRB at a more mature, thoughtful place in their esteemed career. Opener Interstate recalls some of the breezier, alt.-country stuff they're known for. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Lane, Ramsey, Barrett cover their bases – Covers played a far more prominent role than usual at a country show. And instead of what is typically the least course of resistance in recent years of country artists succumbing to their renditions of a rock hit, Chris Lane, Mason Ramsey and Gabby Barrett played songs that actually were country hits. Interestingly, the youngest of the bunch, Ramsey,... »»»
Concert Review: Mumford and Sons up to snuff, for the most part – Mumford and Sons have always played it smart when it has come to career moves. They have not overtoured by becoming regular fixtures on the touring circuit. Their M.O. is to tour just enough upon an album release and then disappear for a stretch. Ditto for releasing new music ("Delta" just came out last month, Mumford's first release... »»»
Follow Country Standard Time  Subscribe to Country News Digest  Follow Country Standard Time on twitter  Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook 

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Taylor uncovers the past, offering new perspectives Suffice it to say that the past has always loomed large throughout Chip Taylor's career. That's all the more obvious if only for the fact that Taylor wrote some of the biggest pop hits of the '60s, "Wild Thing"... »»»
Tyminski goes dark Dan Tyminski (known simply as "Tyminski" on his 2017 release "Southern Gothic") has traditional music roots and unassailable bluegrass street cred especially given his membership in Alison Krauss' Union Station. He is also a powerful songwriter and has been writing songs for himself and others for years now.... »»»
Washburn, Fleck create "Echoes" Bela Fleck and Abigail Washburn have powerhouse individual talents; each has followed an estimable career path to where they find themselves today: making complex, but spare, records, writing music together and touring with their son Juno. Their new release, "Echoes In The Valley" features mostly songs written by Fleck and Washburn, banjos, Washburn's strong vocals and very little else.... »»»
Woven Waters CD review - Woven Waters
Tellico hails from that bastion of bluegrass and hybrid bluegrass, Asheville, N.C. to deliver its sophomore album "Woven Waters.'' This effort melds their rather inherent bluegrass affinities with British Isle influences,  »»»
Christmas Everywhere CD review - Christmas Everywhere
Rodney Crowell's "Christmas Everywhere" is a (mostly) melancholy collection of songs, with Christmas time as its setting. It's a strong set of carefully worded tunes, set to widely varying musical backings.  »»»
The Southern Ground Sessions CD review - The Southern Ground Sessions
Blackberry Smoke's "The Southern Ground Sessions" EP is five versions of songs from the band's recent "Find a Light" album, along with a cover of Tom Petty's "You Got Lucky," which also features vocalist/violinist Amanda Shires. »»»
Hard Times and White Lines CD review - Hard Times and White Lines
Whitey Morgan's fourth studio release exhibits the singer/songwriter's reverence for outlaw country and southern rock. The influence of Hank Williams, Jr. is evident on the opening "Honky Tonk Hell" with lyrics that »»»
Live at the Ryman CD review - Live at the Ryman
Jason Isbell didn't record this live effort at The Ryman Auditorium as a gesture to be country music's savior at The Mother Church of Country Music. The Alabama native's music is country-adjacent at best, more than it is »»»
The Place That You Call Home CD review - The Place That You Call Home
The unusual name Ever More Nest is the project name for New Orleans-based, Shreveport, La.- raised singer-songwriter Kelcy Wilburn (aka Kelcy Mae). She has the poet's gift for lyrics and an engaging, lovely voice.  »»»