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Songwriter Andrew Dorff dies

Wednesday, December 21, 2016 – Songwriter Andrew Dorff, who had songs recorded by Kenny Chesney, Hunter Hayes and Martina McBride, died on Monday at 40.

No cause of death was given for Dorff.

Dorff enjoyed hits with Chesney's "Save It for a Rainy Day" and Hayes' "Somebody's Heartbreak." He also had songs covered with Martina McBride's "Ride," Blake Shelton's "My Eyes" and "Neon Light," Ronnie Dunn's "Bleed Red," Old Dominion's "Shut Me Up," Gary Allan's "Kiss Me When I'm Down" and William Michael Morgan's "Missing."

Droff's father, Steve, a fellow songwriter, posted on Facebook, "Thank you all for the outpouring of love and prayer...There simply are no words for the unbearable heartbreaking loss my family and I are feeling today. May God bless my Son Andrew, the best friend any Father could have. Your light will forever shine in my heart, and in all those who were lucky enough to know you."

Songwriter Natalie Hemby wrote on Facebook, "I literally wrote with Andrew Dorff and Rodney Clawson the other day. He was looking forward to going on vacation... He looked and seemed happy and healthy... We talked about 2017, his birthday, his new tattoo, and we talked about his mother. His mother he loved so much, who passed away years ago. We wrote a song called "Call your mom"... I can't believe he's gone. Gone too soon. My prayers are with the Dorff family."

Dorff also is the brother of Hollywood actor Stephen Dorff. George Strait's "I Cross My Heart," Kenny Rogers' "Through the Years" and Eddie Rabbitt's "Every Which Way but Loose."

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