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Flatt Lonesome takes 3 IBMAs, The Earls of Leicester win big one

Wednesday, September 28, 2016 – Flatt Lonesome won three International Bluegrass music Association Awards on Thursday, but Earls of Leicester won the big one, Entertainer of the Year.

Flatt Lonesome - a band that includes siblings Kelsi, Charli and Buddy Robertson - won for Album, Song and Vocal Group of the Year. Other multiple award winners include Becky Buller who was awarded the Female Vocalist and Fiddle Player of the Year, and The Earls of Leicester members took home solo categories Dobro Player of the Year (Jerry Douglas), Bass Player of the Year (Barry Bales) and Banjo Player of the Year (Charlie Cushman).

Other winners were at the 27th annual edition held in Raleigh, N.C. were:
Male Vocalist of the Year: Danny Paisley
Instrumental Group of the Year: Frank Solivan & Dirty Kitchen
Song of the Year: "You're the One," Flatt Lonesome
Album of the Year: Runaway Train, Flatt Lonesome
Gospel Recorded Performance of the Year: All Dressed Up, Joe Mullins and the Radio Ramblers
Instrumental Recorded Performance of the Year: "Fireball," Special Consensus featuring Rob Ickes, Trey Hensley and Alison Brown
Emerging Artist of the Year: Mountain Faith
Recorded Event of the Year: "Longneck Blues," Junior Sisk and Ronnie Bowman
Guitar Player of the Year: Bryan Sutton
Mandolin Player of the Year: Sierra Hull
Inductees into the Bluegrass HOF: Clarence White; the Rounder Founders: Ken Irwin, Marian Leighton Levy and Bill Nowlin
Distinguished Achievement Award: Bluegrass Unlimited Magazine, Boston Bluegrass Union, SiriusXM Radio's Bluegrass Junction, Bill Emerson, Jim Rooney

Co-hosted by Sierra Hull and Dan Tyminski, the show's Bluegrass on Screen theme featured performances like "Man of Constant Sorrow" by Soggy Bottom Boys ("Oh Brother, Where Art Thou"), "Rainbow Connection" by the Lonely Heartstring Band ("The Muppets") and the inclusion of archival clips from classics like "The Beverly Hillbillies," "Bonnie and Clyde," and "Deliverance."

Flatt Lonesome, The Earls of Leicester, Balsam Range, Del McCoury Band, Gibson Brothers, Lonesome River Band, IIIrd Tyme Out, Hull and the Becky Buller Band all performed.

More news for Flatt Lonesome

CD reviews for Flatt Lonesome

Runaway Train CD review - Runaway Train
To those with even only a passing familiarity with the history of bluegrass, the name of this young band from Florida is an obvious tribute to the pioneers of the music as exemplified in the person of the late, great Lester Flatt. Perhaps more than any other genre of American music, though, bluegrass has lent itself to acts for whom the music is the "family business," and the core of Flatt Lonesome's sound is guitarist Buddy Robertson and his sisters Kelsi (mandolin) and Charli (fiddle). »»»
Too CD review - Too
The current darlings of the bluegrass world, Flatt Lonesome returns with its second album; "Too" is a considerable improvement over last year's inconsistent debut. The strength of this family-based band, centered about the Robertson siblings, remains the passion for vocal performance. Whether considering Buddy's straightforward approach on "Dangerous Dan," (reminiscent of song co-writer Tim Stafford) or the sweet back-and-forth of sisters Charli and Kelsi (as on »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Lane, Ramsey, Barrett cover their bases – Covers played a far more prominent role than usual at a country show. And instead of what is typically the least course of resistance in recent years of country artists succumbing to their renditions of a rock hit, Chris Lane, Mason Ramsey and Gabby Barrett played songs that actually were country hits. Interestingly, the youngest of the bunch, Ramsey,... »»»
Concert Review: Mumford and Sons up to snuff, for the most part – Mumford and Sons have always played it smart when it has come to career moves. They have not overtoured by becoming regular fixtures on the touring circuit. Their M.O. is to tour just enough upon an album release and then disappear for a stretch. Ditto for releasing new music ("Delta" just came out last month, Mumford's first release... »»»
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