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Kid Rock looks to enjoy Taste of Country

Friday, January 22, 2016 – Kid Rock was named as the third and final headliner at the 4th Annual Taste of Country Music Festival, coming June 10-12 at Hunter Mountain Resort in the Catskill area of New York.

Kid Rock will join Kenny Chesney and Jake Owen, who were previously announced as headliners, plus Gary Allan, Big & Rich, Frankie Ballard, Eric Paslay, Old Dominion, Neal McCoy, The Swon Brothers, The Cadillac Three, Jana Kramer, Chris Janson, Outshyne and Annie Bosko on the TOC stage in 2016.

This marks Kid Rock's first appearance at the Taste of Country Music Festival. His latest album, "First Kiss," debuted atop the Billboard's Top Rock Albums Chart. "Kid Rock's cross-over country has wide appeal and lends itself nicely to the festival, which features every genre of country music," said Dhruv Prasad, Executive Vice President, Live Events, Townsquare Media Inc.

The Bud Light Stage, featuring a diverse mix of rising country music talent, will once again be part of the festival's array of entertainment. Logan Brill, Adley Stump, Amanda Watkins, Keith Walker, Jake Worthington, McKenna Faith and Dylan Jakobsen are scheduled to perform.

Tickets are on sale at www.tasteofcountryfestival.com. General admission tickets start at $175 for a 3-day pass, available for a limited time only.

The Taste of Country Music Festival is the only three-day country music camping festival in the northeast. More than 50,000 fans attended the 3rd annual festival.

More news for Kid Rock

CD reviews for Kid Rock

Sweet Southern Sugar CD review - Sweet Southern Sugar
Kid Rock ended his association with Warner Brothers Records and moved to the Nashville-based BBR Records (a division of BMG), home of stars like Jason Aldean and Trace Adkins, and the name of the album certainly evokes Dixie, but that doesn't necessarily mean he's morphing into Kid Country. After all, his lengthy Wikipedia page lists several eras in the man's career - the hip-hop era, the rap-rock era, the heartland rock era, et cetera - and there's no reason to think that this »»»
Born Free CD review - Born Free
No popular act today surveys the country's musical landscape quite like Kid Rock. He came to us as a rap ringmaster, evolved into Bob Seger's soul-shuffle, and finally channeled the spirits of Bocephus, Cash and Waylon. On "Born Free," Rock finally arrives at the Nashville-by-way-of-Detroit destination he's been aiming at for the last 15 years. It's a satisfying set, with feel-good songs and workingman laments that still sound breezy. One definite highlight is the »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: There's a lot to be said about The Felice Brothers – The Felice Brothers have soldiered on, occupying the fringes of the musical world with ups and downs. After not knowing whether the group would even continue following the departure of half of the band a few years ago, The Felice Brothers continued with a new rhythm section and a new album, "Undressed," that is heavily political.... »»»
Concert Review: Turner bring it on (to his second) home – Frank Turner opined during the first of four sold-out nights of the Lost Evenings Festival that Boston was his home away from his British home. The likable, accessible singer hit the sweet spot not only with his perspective, but his performance as well demonstrated why. Turner made a major change in this year's festival. For the first time, he... »»»
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