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Bentley finds himself "Somewhere On a Beach"

Tuesday, January 19, 2016 – >Dierks Bentley released the lead single from his upcoming disc, "Black," today, "Somewhere On A Beach."

Bentley also announced today that the U.S. leg of his 2016 Somewhere on a Beach Tour will begin on May 12 in Holmdel, N.J. at the PNC Bank Arts Center with Randy Houser and special guest Cam.

"This album is about all phases of a relationship, including the breakups," said Bentley. "'Beach' is a pretty blunt take on that wild rebound we've all had or maybe imagined having. The carefree attitude is exactly the spirit we wanted to bring out on the road this year. I've toured with Randy before, and he's just a great dude - on stage and backstage. And I've gotten to know Cam a little over the last year, and she's fun as hell too and so talented. It's going to be a big summer for sure."

No release date was announced for "Black." Bentley's first performance of the new single is on The Ellen DeGeneres Show today. The song clocks in at 3:20 minutes.

Tour cities are:
Dublin, Ireland
Manchester, England
Glasgow, Scotland
Holmdel, N.J.
Baton Rouge, LA
Bangor, Maine
Hartford, Conn.
Oshkosh, Wisc.
Cadott, Wisc.
Walker, Minn.
Columbus, Ohio
Manhattan, Kansas
North Platte, Neb.
Fort Loramie, Ohio
Raleigh, N.C.
Bristow, VA
Virginia Beach, VA
Cameras, Alberta, Canada
Duncan, British Columbia, Canada
Oro-Mendonte, Ontario, Canada
Syracuse, N.Y.
St. Louis
Mountain View, Cal.
Irvine, Cal
San Diego
Eugene, Ore,
Boise, Idaho
Salt Lake City, Utah

More news for Dierks Bentley

CD reviews for Dierks Bentley

Black CD review - Black
Dierks Bentley seems intent on expanding his musical boundaries, but he may have overreached too much in eschewing where he came from. That most evident by the dominating textured beats. Producer Ross Copperman and Bentley seem hell bent on injecting odd meters and sounds, sharp detours from past efforts. Unfortunately, the atmospheric beats muddy up the vocal delivery on "Freedom," a song that stretches far too long at almost four minutes. Bentley also channels U2 with its »»»
Riser CD review - Riser
Change was in store for Dierks Bentley when it came to recording his seventh album, "Riser." On the personal front, he lost his father and added to his family, clearly affecting the subject matter of his latest. On the musical front, he traded long-time producer Brett Beavers, producer of every disc except "Up on the Ridge," for Ross Copperman, who has enjoyed more success as a writer, including several previous tracks for Bentley. Bentley embraces current trends in country »»»
Up on the Ridge CD review - Up on the Ridge
Dierks Bentley takes a left, turn, sort of, on his fifth studio disc. Bentley has built a solid reputation as a country artist with a slew of hits and catchy songs with edge. But here, Bentley goes bluegrass or at least 12 songs steeped in that sound. This is nothing new for Bentley, who previously has recorded bluegrass songs. Much to his credit, Bentley does not come off as a dilettante, but, instead, someone who feels comfortable with the music from the lead-off title track to the closing sad »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Cantrell continues to satisfy – Laura Cantrell may never be a country star. Not at this stage of her career when she's 50, touring here and there and releasing new music every few years or so. But five albums in, Cantrell continues as a warm, enjoyable and worthy purveyor of her brand of country. That would mean going towards a more traditional side, not rushing the songs... »»»
Concert Review: Not only is Turner traditional, he's popular – Every time Josh Turner reached for some of those wonderful subterranean low notes, which he often pulled out during his enjoyable night show, it was like a superhero applying a superpower. He didn't need this extra advantage to please his audience; he has so many quality songs stockpiled in his catalogue already doing the job.... »»»
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